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Concrete Pad DIY...?

Discussion in 'Nonsense Anything Boards' started by Dinklimit, Aug 29, 2017.

  1. Dinklimit

    Dinklimit Yo Ho, Yo Ho a pirate's life for me...

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    I am planning to make a concrete pad for a BBQ/cooking area in my backyard for my mom and dad.

    Do I need rebar for extra strength/durability/structural integrity if the pad is small to medium size...? What if its a pretty large pad...?

    I am planning on making a concrete pad...oh say about...4 inches thick and 6' wide by 8' length.

    Do I need the rebar or can I forgo the rebar...? Is there an alternative to rebar...?

    How thin of a concrete slab can most people get away with if 4" is too thick (cost wise)...? Is it possible to make a 2" thick slab with no rebar and still have it be strong/durable enough for outdoor use...?
     
  2. Bigeasy

    Bigeasy yeah, yeah!

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    Waiting on responses too! Any takers?
     
  3. PoolMan

    PoolMan 7 'dines short of a full scoop

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    4" thick. 3/8" rebar at 16" centers. Maybe one joint down the middle to make to rectangles of 4' by 6'. If you are going to put a finish on it (broom or salt) I would hire someone to help with that part. At 4" thick one yard of concrete is about 70 sqaure feet, so you need 2/3 of a yard. That is alot to hand mix and you won't be able to give it a good finish. Cement truck and a wheelbarrow is the way to go if access allows..
     
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  4. wils

    wils lazy-ass well known "member"

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    I'll be your Huckleberry.... :rofl:

    Its your pad, you can do whatever you want to do. :D
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    Poolman's got you going in the right direction.

    Redi-mix companies have a minimum delivery charge. $450? anyone? Buehler?

    Since you're going to need a wheelbarrow and a shovel anyway, man-up and mix that chit by hand. Anyone can become an expert after 1 or 2 youtube DIY videos.
    If Mexicans can do it, you can do it.
     
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  5. Mark50

    Mark50 Old newbie

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    Unless the concrete truck is going to park on it a 2x4 frame will leave you with a solid slab and no rebar really needed....it's only a BBQ !!!!
     
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  6. longspear

    longspear Newbie

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    6/6 wire mesh most rental yards have small tow behind mixers
     
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  7. wils

    wils lazy-ass well known "member"

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    maybe use that fiberglass reinforced mud that the redi-mix companies brag so much about. no rebar/wire mesh required...... and after brooming it, the fiberglass hairs will give you an extra non-skid aspect.
     
  8. fishstomp

    fishstomp Picaroon

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    Call around to the local equipment rental yards. Up here most of them have ready mix concrete available in trailers ready to go for these small projects. And they are willing to give you advice on how to do it.
     
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  9. Gearhead 59

    Gearhead 59 Member

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    United Rentals has portable tow behind cement mixers that they fill right at their yard used one to fill up a planter box in my patio about the same size as yours, no rebar was used holding up 8 years and going strong.
     
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  10. eric harner

    eric harner Caliente Tuna

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    X2 at Home Depot
     
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  11. KnotyBuoyz

    KnotyBuoyz Not so newbie anymore

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    A 6x8 pad for a light weight barbecue island does not need rebar, wire or fiber mesh and it is a waste of time and money in my opinion. There are millions of square feet of unreinfoced concrete all over SO CAL. City sidewalks and driveway aprons are unreinforced concrete.

    Let's get on with the build, so we have a 6x8x.33 pad which = 15.84 cf which = .586 cy or you can go 6x8= 48sf then divide by 81 sf per yard at 4" thick which = .592 cy. A 2500psi mix or more works for your application.

    15.84 cf x 142 lbs per cf = 2249.28 lbs of blended material. Then divide by 90 lb bags = 24.99 bags of heavy lifting during a heat wave. You and that material need to be properly hydrated.

    Make sure you brush up on hot weather concrete work practices which can be found in the ACI manual section 305.1. Whatever you do, please cure the material properly. Thank you, good luck with your project and class dismissed:D
     
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  12. FishinMcNuggets

    FishinMcNuggets Fishin fo' Nutrition!

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    My Father-In-Law is a concrete & masonry finishing pro. Based outta Long Beach, I know he'd do at least 4" thick, most likely with rebar reinforcement. You never know what the pad turns into later, parking, storage shed base pad, dance floor for two tons of relatives, car repair spot with hoist, boat parking. Just sayin... I'd do that!

    Brush finish is nice, make sure framing forms angles that run water away from home foundations, and towards garden or drainage! Well done concrete is thing of beauty. Bad concrete is worse than none at all. Go with an experienced finishing guy, it will make all the difference. You can also ask at a materials yard if they recommend someone based on your criteria.

    -Mike
     
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  13. marlyn

    marlyn I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    Form it up yourself,go grab a mixer trailer at the rental yard and drive it home where the finisher that you paid 200.00 for the day will pour it and finish it with his tools while you drink a cool beer,drive trailer back to rental place,tell friends on Monday about the bitchin slab you built this weekend.
     
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  14. Bigeasy

    Bigeasy yeah, yeah!

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    Concrete is not forgiving if you fukitup! Good information here!
     
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  15. sealskinner

    sealskinner Retired Pimp

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    Concrete is not rocket science. In the old days, with small slabs. I've seen chain link fence used. Just elevate it. But one of this size. You don't need it.
     
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  16. KnotyBuoyz

    KnotyBuoyz Not so newbie anymore

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    True it is not rocket science, but in this heat, concrete can and will go off (meaning dry)like a rocket and that is not good. As stated by Bigeasy, it is a very unforgiving material. One must have the knowledge and know how to control the hydration process when forming, casting and finishing the materials. If not, the finished product will simply not be what it should be.

    Concrete structures can be a thing of beauty and a work of art. There is a difference between work and workmanship.:D
     
  17. Airbike

    Airbike Member

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    OK, I'll throw a few words in.

    1) Don't forget to make sure the soil is compacted well or you'll likely get uneven settling and cracks.

    2) Make sure the slab has room to expand. IE: don't butt up against a house footing and a block wall (or add a strip of expansion felt). Many "captured" slabs end up with spider cracks all over.

    3) Consider paver stones as an alternative, or even several large A/C condenser pads. Wont crack and you can always re-position them. No concrete to mix or finish. Can be as fancy or plain as you like.

    Don't work on 100+ degree days....go fishing instead...!
     
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  18. sealskinner

    sealskinner Retired Pimp

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    That's why concrete guys pour early in the morning. Usually concrete guys are done by 1.
     
  19. Let em eat 74

    Let em eat 74 Well-Known "Member"

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    I've done concrete for my whole adult life. It is not easy to accomplish a nice pad for a rookie. Even some of my guys with several years of experience can't pull it off alone.
    First and foremost is soil prep. If the ground below is no good (soft) the concrete can and will crack over time and will look very poor (especially at 4" thick) and pavers have similar issues with this as well. A heavy hand tamp (square iron 10"x10" with the handle in the middle would be a minimum along with just the right amount of water to the soil. It's always better to cut it into the ground than to build it up above it.
    Rebar is helpful but not necessary for a small pad like you describe. If the soil is poor, the more likely you are to need it. Use your judgement there.
    Next to consider is mix design. Pads like yours are best poured with 1" Rock in it. Larger Rock has less powder cement, but has more shear (resistance to cracking). A 3000 psi mix is best since it is more flexible than 4000 or higher which is more prone to cracking.
    Next is delivery. Sure you could order a yard from a plant or rent a mixer trailer, but a short load truck sounds like the best fit for your situation. The truck carries powder cement, sand, rock, and water onboard and mixes it in the chute on the way down. Pay for what you use, not what you don't. Less hassle here but slightly more expensive.
    On the day of. Place that shit as fast as you possibly can. Get it in the forms and don't stop until you do. Concrete is a mean bastard, fall behind and you never will catch up. Use a straight edged 2x4 on top of your forms to level it and get a bull float on it asap. Now you can breathe a little. Half inch edger for the sides against the forms once it sets a little then trowel smooth several times (more floating, troweling steps aligns the aggregate and makes a better, harder finish). Broom it when it's ready.

    Option 2.
    Offer someone who knows what they are doing $200-300 and drink beers while you watch him sweat.
    Don't forget to offer him a few as well, us concrete guys love the stuff.

    image.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2017
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