Colonello Memorial 10/23 - 11/2/ 2022

Montaukmaniac

Thats my son, not me.
Feb 8, 2011
1,045
1,289
Westchester NY
Name
Steve
Boat Name
miss ion/fish on, "Wish on"
“I measure the success of my seasons, as much by what I’ve learned, as by what I’ve caught.” John Skinner, author & angler.

"Many men go fishing all their lives without knowing that is not fish that they are after." Henry David Thoreau

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When you're traveling from a great distance to fish San Diego Long-Range, the deployment of equipment and resources need to be well planned. Over more than a decade of enjoying this incredible fishery, tactics had evolved & lessons learned. A friend from “Table 5” advised to consider Alaska Airlines, which has a great "sports equipment" policy. This allows for an angler to ship both a rod tube and a tackle box & only be charged for “one piece” of equipment. This not only cuts costs but reduces interaction with large shippers, who charge a significant premium to ship "oversized" equipment coast-to-coast. This is a big improvement over having to interact with them, both sending & receiving the equipment. Shipping most of the other stuff via USPS Quick Ship Boxes, allows for heavier items (lead, jigs, trolling lures and Wahoo bombs) to be sent at reasonable cost. A typical trip to San Diego trips will include 6 -7 of these boxes, shipped out a minimum of 14 days in advance.

While on the phone with a friend, who had very generously agreed to pick me up at the airport he asked: “did you check with the landing, to make sure all your stuff arrived?” Without a moment’s pause, I related that my boxes had for more than a dozen years, "always arrived without a hitch." (“Murphy” was laughing somewhere… )

After my friend drops me off at the hotel early in the afternoon, I make my way across the street to Fisherman's landing. Stopping by the front desk I head towards the package room with one of the guys from the counter. (We talked about fishing conditions and how helpful the staff has been over the years.) Immediately I spot one of my quick ship boxes & shortly thereafter the package with my jig box, both of which were shipped as a secondary batch. The first six boxes are nowhere to be found! We checked behind the counter, in the storage room & then head back to the front desk. It was odd that packages sent later had arrived, while six boxes shipped 5 days earlier had not… I remarked that on occasion things end up in the XL or overflow lockers & we go to check there. Nothing! Then I contact the business office to see if the first shipment of six boxes ended up there. Not a thing! Heading back to the desk, we do the entire drill over again as a sinking feeling begins to overtake my enthusiasm. Alternate scenarios abound. I begin to think of the emoji with the mushroom cloud vaporizing its head…

Since all of the missing boxes are USPS, a recommendation is made to check with the Point Loma PO. I head back to the hotel to get my file with the shipping receipts. There I discover that although I have the receipt for the Jig box & the USPS quick ship box I already have, the earlier shipment receipt for the six boxes is AWOL. Then I called a friend, who was in the know re: USPS & its procedures, but we made no progress. Getting back to the landing’s front desk I explained my dilemma & hoping to perhaps obtain the shipping receipt electronically.

The guy the computer was very helpful but could not locate a receipt numbers for the early shipment, using the reference number from the later shipment. He inquired: "were some of those packages heavy?" "Oh yeah": I responded explaining how neon pink HEAVY stickers were affixed to 3 of the boxes! He remarked to his boss that he very likely handled those boxes and places them in front of the package room… Still nothing could be located. So I'm off to the Point Loma PO.

In a remarkable stroke of luck the manager on duty at the PO recalled our conversation last year when, I was sending my equipment back to the East Coast. He tried to research off the number for the second shipment receipt, but we were dead in the water without the original numbers. Heading back to the hotel I try to assess what gear was missing and what it will mean to my 10 day trip. (It's the emoji with the mushroom cloud vaporizing its head.) I get on the phone with my wife and daughter and have them check for the missing receipt, which ultimately turns up in a pile of stuff left from thinning out my wallet pre-trip. Heading back to the landing desk we run the numbers on the computer with the manager looking on. The young guy who remembered the packages was super quick & we learned that three had indeed arrived & three were marked "in transit". By now it's 4 PM and the manager Tony says: "we checked everything, the business office, locker, the overflow locker, the mailroom & behind the counter storage. The only possibility left is that it may have been loaded on the boat." He gets on the satellite phone & after some conversation, Tony pulls the rabbit is out of the hat! The six boxes are all on board. Tons of kudos for Tony and a gratuity for all my friends the counter leaves me with my brain & trip fully intact.

These days I usually build in 24 hours to deal with the time-consuming unpacking, assessing, managing & redeploying equipment. Then I'm off to visiting various tackle shops, the liquor store, Target & Cosco to get gifts for the crew. The entire time consuming tackle redeployment goes out the window, but everything else including dinner with fellow passengers moves forward. The office helpfully has the six boxes retrieved back to the dock, while we all line up for check in. All of the redeployment happens on-the-fly, while lining up with everyone else's baggage & equipment. The final laughable indignity happens as I'm unpacking and repacking everything to go on board, when the packages are massively strafed by an offending seagull!

10/23 Lining up for the redshirts is normally a enjoyable activity reconnecting with lots of anglers who shared the rail together for years & getting to know some of the more recent additions to the passenger list. While I am busy with my gear, I keep one ear attuned to the conversation. Scuttlebutt is discussed at length. We perusing this year's itinerary, lamenting the size of Wahoo reported, whether we will fish for BFT early, at the end of the trip or, at all. Projections are made about the captain’s choice of venues, contrasting reports of recent trips, as well as information gleaned from anglers with "good Intel".

Our crew for the trip includes Justin Fleck as Capt., Mike Ramirez - second Capt., deckhands are the always motivated Vance, high-energy Will, young Chase and new man Kiel. Although new to XL, he was quite experienced and helpful. Our very talented returning Chef was Richard & his assistant was Ulysses.

We eventually cast off & headed over to the bait receivers. Richard our Chef served up a snack of banana cake & fresh fruit. PIX! Passengers stowed gear & racked their rods. The crew and Capt. loaded bait over 2 hrs.
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For those who were observant, (passengers, pelicans & egrets)
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the process was notable, for the size of the sardines that were loaded for the first 1.5hrs. Also notable, but curious, was a batch of smaller ‘dines that followed. We headed out of the harbor & the “order of operations” was established. The captain would be in touch with the other long-range boats to gather “intel” to determine out destination. Roundabout dinnertime we were told that we would make a run to Alijos Rocks and bank. For us, the possibility to target BFT would not arrive until we headed back north. While this plan of action had been SOP in past Colonello 10 days, some were hoping for an early shot at the BFT early.

10/24 Most of us use the day to rig, catch up with old friends, make new ones & socialize. With a 13 rod quiver, the opportunity is always appreciated.
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The vast majority of my setups are spectra, FG’ed to short (3-7ft.) fluorocarbon top shots, San Diego jammed to a ringed hook. My Mak SAa 30 II was rigged with 25 feet of 200 pound mono as a shock leader. The Avet HX Raptor with 100 Fluro & held in reserve for final rigging. One for bait & the other for 400 + g knife jigs. My Mac SEa 20 became a dedicated Wahoo troller, with 25 feet of 100 pound mono, double San Diego jammed to the swivel of a 275 pound cable, rigged by SquidCo to a JRI Hooker Intruder.

Mike V, a tenacious and talented angler who can never get enough time wetting a line, got the okay to “speed troll” some feathers, as we headed south. This resulted in a couple of Dorado’s that afternoon, that were donated to the galley. Richard prepared a fantastic dinner of roasted pork loin with garlic mashed potatoes & string beans followed by scoop of mint ice cream, with a brownie.
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Captain reports hearing that some Wahoo have been tagged & a nice grade of yellowtail had been put in the RSW, with local mackerel for bait.

10/25 Vance gives a tackle seminar after breakfast & covers fly line, light sinker rig and dropper loop. He strongly encourages using 1/0 or 2/0 circle hooks. Everyone gets their final rigging in order & deckhands assist. We troll our way down to the rocks & arrive about noon. Richard prepared a fantastic shrimp lo-mein for lunch. Shortly thereafter captain calls for sardines to be thrown in "twos & threes" and the action begins. It somewhat of a plunker bite with Dorado 3 to 15 pounds & mixed yellowtail 5 to 20 pounds, with some lucky anglers landing +25 pound fish. We move & periodically put out the troller's for Wahoo but only get a couple of “WeeHoo”. As this was our first day of fishing & my freezer well-stocked with tuna all of my fishing was catch and release. PIX! Figuring that we would have ample opportunity for a better grade of Dorado & considering the Mexican regulations, I would reserve for larger fish. Many folks opted to tag some of these and everyone was stoked to put a bend in their rods. Richard prepares marinated flank steak for dinner with a Fleck family potato recipe, which turned out to be quite tasty! Capt. informs us that were going to fish for mackerel after dinner, so that we can be ready for YT fishing after midnight on Alijos bank. Sabki fishing is often a situation where some enjoy complaining about having to make bait, unavoidable snafus & others enjoy the catching. It took us a while to make enough bait & even when cautioned to "spread out" the inevitable entanglements developed. Once we had enough bait we slid over to use the macks on the yellows. Many of us finished from 10 PM to 12 PM with only one small yellowtail to show for it. Several went to bed or dozed in the galley or on deck chairs.

10/26 Awakened in the galley, I shuffled on deck about 3 AM & saw 3 anglers there. Wayne had taken a folding chair and was sitting fishing the rail via dropper loop. I set up in the starboard corner. About 45 min. later Wayne gets bit and is into a nice YT. He quickly gets the greenback off the bottom and encounters some squirrely behavior about halfway up. He winds furiously, but by the time he boats the fish a grinner has bit tail off of a 30+ yellow! He donates what's left to the galley. A little later Shannon N brings a nice grade YT to the gaff. A friend catches a really nice sized Skullpin. Then Steve (one of 3 this year) who's new to the trip, also tags his first YT and is very jazzed! I'm using my classic dropper loop set up, which is an old SS 6465 HX that was refinished by Rod wrapper extraordinaire Jim Trelikes some years ago. It is paired with an Accurate BX 2 600 spooled with JB HC 80 pound, FG’ed to 80 pound mono with a surgeons loop to the 7/0 Owner Muto, via a San Diego Jam. Using a tip from last year’s charter master John Carlson, I used on a old snap swivel salvaged from a discarded Sabiki rig. Using this to secure my 16 oz sinker, ensures that if snared in the rocks it would simply straighten the wire clip rather than lose the entire rig. It's then a simple matter to fix the clip and added a new sinker. Around 4:30 AM I pin on a medium-size mack & drop down. Touching bottom I retrieved two revolutions and slowly angle my rod tip up and down. Soon I feel that mackerel reacting to something and I'm quickly bit. Angling the rod against the rail and cranking for all I am worth results in a beautiful arc, screaming drag & the mossback heading south and portside. Keeping the SS 6465 bent, I wind tenaciously until I get deep color. Kyle is there with the gaff and a nice 25-ish YT is tagged and in the box.
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Ten -15 min. later I rinse and repeat, landing my second 25-30 lb greenback on deck. The grade is good and I race inside to quickly alert several slumbering friends, as to what's happening on deck. Perhaps now there are 8 to 10 anglers on deck and I drop back down. The yellows really like those fresh mackerel and 10 min. later I'm bent almost double on another small freight, train! This results in a nice 30 - 35-ish YT. Fist bumps and hand slaps down the line, along with kudos for rousing my friends. (Later, I also get a pile of “ear excrement” for not dashing further below decks to roust another dreaming angler… ) The bite continues until sharks interrupt the action. I hooked up with a really nice bendo, but I end up bit off by a hammerhead. Others got “ripped off’ by a marauding Mako. Len D, Paul W and Larry all tag some nice grade YT. As gray light becomes sunup the action slows. The Capt. assigned trolling team # 1, for HOO in the stern, as we motor our way back to Alijo's rocks. Around 10 AM we are trolling Alijos, John N, Erric T & Ron H land the first 3 Wahoo of the trip.
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We alternate between tuna stops & Wahoo trolling. I tag single mid grade Dorado, for the RSW after sending several neck ties back to grow up.
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We continue to pick through smaller grade Dorado/tuna & David L (aka Ducky), Chuck C & Mike V catch a few of the better grade between 25-45 lbs. (I take a one better grade tuna perhaps 20 lbs.) Plenty of 10-15 grade tuna were taken by anglers for the table. Although lots of stops were made, it was difficult to locate a consistently better grade of fish.

TBC below....
 
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Montaukmaniac

Thats my son, not me.
Feb 8, 2011
1,045
1,289
Westchester NY
Name
Steve
Boat Name
miss ion/fish on, "Wish on"
Took you a month to write that report… it was worth the wait! Uly is normally a deckhand!
(Some have a remarkable command of the obvious.) Thanks for the kudos!
My apologies for the belated but dedicated reporting. Tech issues stalled the availability of my photos.... AND the dog ate my homework... Thanksgiving...

Yes! On the next trip he was on deck.
 
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Montaukmaniac

Thats my son, not me.
Feb 8, 2011
1,045
1,289
Westchester NY
Name
Steve
Boat Name
miss ion/fish on, "Wish on"
Colenello Memorial Continued

10/27 We troll after breakfast & at about 8:30 AM Wayne S & Troy S tagged a couple of nice Hoo. Larry L follows with one on a bomb and around 9 AM Ron H hooks a Pargo. We alternate between trolling the Ridge and stopping for Dorado & school tuna. At about 10:30 AM Shannon N lands a nice grouper of about 20-30 lbs. Quickly thereafter John N tags they nice 25- 30ish YFT. 11:30 AM Wayne gets his second Wahoo of the day, a truly hefty mode, on a missed troll stop. Paul W lands a “WeHoo” in the next 30 min. on a yellow Nomad. Linda & Fred who are new to the trip also tag a couple of Hoo!
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So far I have no Wahoo. My time on troll team 2 was good duration. Team # 2 was put out on the troll four times but Ron H was the only one to land a skinny on our team. I went at it with a vengeance.

Alternately I was throwing my JRI Lime Green Hooacide Bomb that was FG’ed to a single strand of 100 Lb fluorocarbon and San Diego jamed to a 75 pound Tactical Angler clip, on my Jim Trelikes wrapped Phoenix PDH 809 XH, paired with a JX raptor. When my arm would give out, I would switch to a spinning set up, which would allow me to wind with my other hand. (I heard about this tactic on BD years ago from Fishybuzz.) Using an Atlantic Custom wrapped United Composites CP – 7503 that was matched with a Penn TRG-7, again FG’ed to 100 pounds floro and San Diego jamed to another 75 pound Tactical Angler clip, which had a beautiful newly issued JRI “True Blue Hooacide” bomb. At each trolling stop I would switch from one to the other, once fatigue set in. About 10 min. into a Wahoo stop I was throwing my JRI Lime Green Hooacide Bomb on my Phoenix PDH. I sent one out from the portside diagonally, really long sternwards. I get it about halfway back and I’m bit, good. That skinny goes screaming up towards the bow. Alerting my shipmates as I run up the rail: “biter!” The Hoo gets about three quarters of the way up the bow and decides to about-face & headed to the stern. As I go back down directing “coming down, over, hot rail, under, under!" I wind furiously, get to deep color & then color. I can tell it's a nice sized fish and see that bright lime green bomb in its mouth. Vance is right behind me with the gaff in hand. He comments "three more turns Steve" and I crank for all I'm worth, one, two and then that Hoo’is gone! I'm incredulous… I turn and look at Vance. He looks at me with his eyes wide and says "did you see that!" "See what? What happened?" Vance looks me in the eye and asks "didn't you see that?" "How the hell did that fish get off, he was tight all the way.” Vance explained that as my fish was coming parallel with the boat another Wahoo came from behind and hit the lime green bomb, just before it could be gaffed. "It knocked that bomb right out of your Wahoo's mouth!" So instead of me getting a better grade of Hoo, all I got was a crazy predator’s reaction bite story. $#!+, $#!+,$#!+

We continue heading south down the ridge, tagging school tuna, (catch & release for me) dorado and are moderately successful on the skinny's. That day we got six on one-stop & a total of 22 for the XL. The captain announces that were going to fish for yellowtail & Pargo after dinner. Vance goes over fishing for pargo using small flatfall jigs and dropper loop. Vance urges that we use the 1/0 and 2/0 Circle hooks with smaller sardines because of the pargo’s smaller mouth & not overreact to a bite, pulling those ‘dines out of the pargos little mouth. Chef Rich prepares a beautiful salad and a fantastic broiled, bone in, pork chop on a bed of puréed acorn squash and medley of brussel sprouts, carrots & potatoes.
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We fish a number of stops and had a mixed bag of yellowtail on yo-yo jigs & the dropper loop. The YT range from conventional 10+ grade up to mid 30s. Sometime between 7:30 & 8 PM pargo start coming over the rail. Most of them came on the smaller sardines with a dropper loop. Larry had three or a small colt sniper. PIX! I was fishing 80-100gr flatfall jigs switching back and forth between sardine colored and chartreuse glow jigs, but was notably unsuccessful. Just at the time I switched over to bait, the captain had decided to move on. Only one fish in the box had my number & that was donated due to a processing limit! Those using small baits were very effective & by the time we moved off the "Pargo Party" spot, the 29 passengers had had tagged about 47 beautiful pargo ranging from 5 to 10 lbs.

10/28 Moving along after breakfast on Friday, the captain calls for the deckhands to chum in “two’s and three’s”. Pretty soon where on a good school of yellowtail! Tenacious Mike V is fishing a scrambled egg yo-yo & has 2 fish for two drops. Most of us are fishing dropper loop with the bigger grade of sardines, on 12-16 oz. Everyone’s doing well on 15 - 30 lb YT. PIX! I put a few in the RSW & donate a few to other angler’s tags. The bite is just shy of a ripper & goes on from 7 AM -12 PM. The tally for the day was 120+ yellowtail for the XL. After lunch we start to head north to a shallow spot towards the start of the ridge and try for some Wahoo. Wayne fishing a dropper on one of these stops gets himself a nice 10- 15 pound tan grouper. My friend Larry continues a Colonello streak & bags himself a nice 50 lbs + grouper around 4:30 PM.

TBC below...
 
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JohnTFT

Insomniac
Feb 11, 2007
1,377
4,400
The "718"
Name
John
Boat Name
A big Steel One
The stress of dealing with getting gear from the east coast to left cant be underestimated.

Glad you found your gear!

Best thing that ever happened to me - leaving my gear at a friends house in SD.

Great write up!
 
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Montaukmaniac

Thats my son, not me.
Feb 8, 2011
1,045
1,289
Westchester NY
Name
Steve
Boat Name
miss ion/fish on, "Wish on"
Colenello Memorial 2022 Conclusion:

10/29 On Saturday will we continue to fish the north end of the ridge alternately for YFT of mixed grade & yellowtail. Shannon and her husband John both put tags on nicer grade of YT. Al S hooks up with a beautiful Sheepshead.
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Over the past 72- 48 hrs troll team #1 has been up & only managed to hook up with necktie Dorado. The captain keeps reassigning them to troll but they are effectively in ‘trolling prison’. We do what we can to bring cold beverages & snacks out, but their rotation goes on & on and on... Some start talking about them holding the “record” for trolling prison on any Colonello trip, but this courts controversy and tales of woe from past infamy. Richard creates a phenomenal sushi spread for our mid day “snack”!
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Roundabout 2 PM Kim R gets hammered on & lands a beautiful hefty Hoo of 50-ish + lbs!

10/30 Continuing to head north we make a couple of stops on school tuna. On each, I do my catch and release thing for 4 -5 footballs. All enjoy the bite until we become inundated with skipjack & so we moved on. We are traveling up the line. Due to 20-40 mph winds, we journey closer to shore. We learn that XL will target BFT’s around San Clemente for approximately 24 hours. A tackle seminar covers 3 outfits, fly lined bait, sinker rig and knife jigging.
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(Of course the “Eddy bomb“ question comes up and Vance advises that people have been successful & if that's what you want to fish, have at it.) He also goes over the Bralla drop shot rig. It involves tying a ringed circle hook to your line using a San Diego jam to the ring. Then a line is tied to the same ring with attention to the position of the hook so that it points up. The second line is also a San Diego jam to the same ring (at the bottom) then a sinker is tied off approx. 36 inches down.

This last stop late in the trip, presents a conundrum to me as I will usually break down my equipment prior to reaching the dock, in order to be ready for a return home. Planning for my trip back home, I started breaking down equipment & ultimately finished up the next morning.

I hold four outfits for the approximate 24 hrs designated for blue fin. The plan is that we will arrive after dinner on the evening of Halloween. I rigged my UC 76 Viper paired with my Avet HX Raptor (100 pound spectra) for the fly lined bait, using short top shot of FG’d 100 pound fluro, to a San Diego jam, to a ringed 3/0 Owner Muto. Next I converted my Salty Dog 70 XXH and Okuma Mak SEa 30 (rigged with 130 spectra) from a troller, into a knife jigging set up. I FG’d on 10 feet of 200 pound mono as a shock leader. Paul W. had generously helped me to rig up two knife jigs that David L had snagged at his local Melton tackle.
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We attached a 200 pound swivel via crimp & chafing spring to a 36” 200 pound mono leader which in turn was crimped with a chafing spring to the eye of a red and gold 400 g Rip Roller with a J hook at the bottom & 2 assists up top. We did the same thing to a 500 g Glow Rip Roller with a treble hook & 2 assists up top. The glow jig was attached to my trustee Calstar 770 XXH compared with the Okuma Mak SEa 20 rigged exactly like the 30. My last set up was for that Bralla drop shot rig which I rigged my SS 6465 XH which was paired with an Accurate BX two 600, with 80 pound spectra and FG’’d a 80 pound fluro to Bralla setup with a ringed 2/0 Owner Muto. (My intention here was to use this in the event that we encountered school size 60-80 BFTs, rather than the larger grade which I intended to fish with the big jigs or fly line.)

10/31 Everyone spent the day breaking down setups & rigging for our 24 hrs around San Clemente. After dinner the captain announced that we would be fishing for BFT’s and recommended using the knife jigs to dig down deep quickly. Many of us had prior marked our lines so that we were able to follow the captain’s directions of what depth the BFT’s were swimming. Numerous stops were made throughout the night, perhaps a dozen +, but NO blue fin were hooked up!

11/1 We were stoked to fish around the island at dawn, even if it meant we were more likely to encounter school size fish. As we started to cruise around looking for action the captain was contacted by the Navy which informed him of "live fire exercises" and directed him away from the current area of interest! $#!+ $#!+ $#!+ We moved on. We proceeded to circumnavigate the island making several stops on schools mostly in the afternoon. The schools were very persnickety in what we are told is typical Pacific BFT behavior, appearing and disappearing. Ultimately our fishing was unproductive. Two BFT were landed that afternoon, both in the 40 to 50 lb range. I believe both were caught on the Bralla drop shot rigs. The first was by Steve L & the second to my best recollection was by Dave (Ducky) L. Rather than the BFT fishing , sadly the highlight of the day, was the traditional prime rib dinner and tiramisu cake desert, which our chef Rich once again did a phenomenal job.
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Disclaimer: Please be aware that any and all errors are the result of my own addled thinking and likely age-related cognitive decline. I strive to be as accurate as possible but of course as a retired individual, brain farts may occur…
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Thanks: Most importantly, I like to note that we all stand on the shoulders of our betters. MANY thanks to all who participate on the Colonello, both the veterans of many years & those who been more recent additions!! A friend had asked how I had becoming involved in writing up SDLR trips. Years ago creating "photo books" for my son’s fishing trips I needed to add text. I pointed out that my own learning curve was accelerated big-time, by reading posts of those amazing anglers, who spent the time to inform the Long-Range Forum by “sharing their knowledge”. Some of those were Fishybuzz, Wahoo dad, Soda Pop, Jamie, Prof John (TFT) N, Steve K, Guyster, ZZZZ, and likely a dozen others who haven't come to mind, by bridging the synapses of an aging brain. Thanks also to resources like BHP, Squidco, Anglers Choice, the legendary Jim Trelikes at Web Spinner Custom Rods, United Composites, Ringed Hooks, the always extraordinary Jerry G of JRI and countless others who haven't bridged the axons & dendrites…
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(The sky on fire photo above, you may be assured is totally unedited! It was taken by a long time Colonello angler. It's another of the natural SDLR's awesome experiences... )

Takeaways: A) Always check shipped packages ASAP. B) Although you may have heard this about other species, BFT are incredibly squirrelly creatures. C) Bralla drop shot rigs are a keeper! D) No matter what you've seen or done prior, you will be VERY surprised by some of the things that happen when you are at the rail. E) One of the absolutely best features of long-range fishing is the spectacular humans & anglers you will meet along the way! (IE: My friend David L lived close by to Melton tackle and was able to secure for me the Rip Roller's I could not find elsewhere. My friend Paul W help me to create crimped leaders suitable to large knife jig fishing. Len D could not find large Owner SS-66 5/0 trebles & suitable crimps, to rig his jigs, so I purchased them on his behalf. Shannon N, in the heat of the moment, mislabeled a fish with another’s tag # and decided to let it ride. In turn, Kim R donated her hefty Hoo, right back to Shannon N. Lastly, she decided to donate the Hoo with the wrong tag to me! IMHO: Some of the very best humans, go long-range fishing! F) “Pay it forward" when you can, as all of us started out just as green as the next angler did! G) The wonderful “AA-ism” that I heard as a professional in practice so many years ago still applies: "Just because you think something, doesn't necessarily mean you have to say it!" H) As we age, the value of relationships and experiences can come to be much more potent, then material things or acquisitions. I) On occasion a bad day of fishing, can still be better than a good day at work. J) No matter how much you think you appreciated phenomenal fishing in past, average fishing will make you appreciated it WAY more…

See:

https://www.bdoutdoors.com/forums/threads/working-at-the-bank-excel’s-ultra-limited-load-2-2-22-–-2-18-22-16-day-report.789747/

https://www.bdoutdoors.com/forums/threads/eight-days-a-week-at-the-bank.789751/

https://www.bdoutdoors.com/forums/threads/you-can-bank-on-it-notes-from-ultra-limited-16-day.789753/


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https://www.bdoutdoors.com/forums/threads/colonello-memorial-10-24-–-11-3-2021-“we-just-might-have-been-there-yesterday”…-or-“here-comes-the-son”….784955/

Tight lines & screaming reel to all at SDLR!
 
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Steve K

Hey, I'm gettin' bit...
Jan 2, 2005
13,049
10,875
Bishop
Name
Steve
Boat Name
18' Bayrunner, but I like the American Angler and the Red Rooster III
“No matter what you've seen or done prior, you will be VERY surprised by some of the things that happen when you are at the rail.”

Amen to that. Thanks for taking us along with you on your trip.
 
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nicodemus

Fish, he said softly, aloud. I’ll stay with you...
Apr 10, 2012
1,286
2,381
The 505
Name
Nick B
Boat Name
African Queen
All I can think of right now after only skimming this report is Mike Hammer's song, "Can't Touch This."

Awesome report, Maniac, great times.
 
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Montaukmaniac

Thats my son, not me.
Feb 8, 2011
1,045
1,289
Westchester NY
Name
Steve
Boat Name
miss ion/fish on, "Wish on"
The stress of dealing with getting gear from the east coast to left cant be underestimated.

Glad you found your gear!

Best thing that ever happened to me - leaving my gear at a friends house in SD.

Great write up!
John, you are correct re: stress! I loved "Best thing that ever happened to me - leaving my gear at a friends house in SD." This year in the interval between Colonello & the 2023 Ultra, I'm stowing most of my gear at a friends In San Diego, as well! It was "an offer I couldn't refuse!"

(Your kudos are very much appreciated.)
 
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JohnTFT

Insomniac
Feb 11, 2007
1,377
4,400
The "718"
Name
John
Boat Name
A big Steel One
John, you are correct re: stress! I loved "Best thing that ever happened to me - leaving my gear at a friends house in SD." This year in the interval between Colonello & the 2023 Ultra, I'm stowing most of my gear at a friends In San Diego, as well! It was "an offer I couldn't refuse!"

(Your kudos are very much appreciated.)
Steve - I witnessed the care you put into packing your rods for the return to the East side. I was stressed watching.

The first person who stored my gear was Justin Fleck. He had it for years. When he moved, his storage area for gear wasnt finished yet so I keep it at another good friends house in SD. Its not just rods - boots, tackle boxes, tackle bags.

I bring my clothes and a box of reels. Which I UPS - never use the USPS because - you guessed it - they make the stress level really high.

Great writing style thank you for the reports.
 
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Montaukmaniac

Thats my son, not me.
Feb 8, 2011
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Westchester NY
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Steve
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miss ion/fish on, "Wish on"
Steve - I witnessed the care you put into packing your rods for the return to the East side. I was stressed watching.

The first person who stored my gear was Justin Fleck. He had it for years. When he moved, his storage area for gear wasnt finished yet so I keep it at another good friends house in SD. Its not just rods - boots, tackle boxes, tackle bags.

I bring my clothes and a box of reels. Which I UPS - never use the USPS because - you guessed it - they make the stress level really high.

Great writing style thank you for the reports.
"I witnessed the care you put into packing your rods for the return to the East side. I was stressed watching." (Thanks so much for a good laugh this AM, John!)

Other's have commented on the process in past, with mixed opinions...

Stored everything in SD this time except some of the lighter rods. The reels travel with me ALWAYS & only as my overhead bin carry on! (Most of my reels were purchased at retail.)
 
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Panchovilla

Pancho
Feb 14, 2011
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Marina Del Rey CA USA
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Ron
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Pancho Villa
Steve, as always a True Pleasure to share the rail with you and all my others friends,
Your writing makes me feel like I am back on the Big X .....Looking forward to many more years of fishing with you. Thanks for all the time you put into re-creating a factual filled report. Your friend, Ron
 
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vegasandre

I Should Upgrade My Account
Aug 20, 2010
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Andre
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Any Boat that I can go on
Awesome report Steve!
especially loved the opening quotes and takaways at the end.
thorough ,detailed and witty ...
It must be a pain to transport all that gear from that far away.
maybe a storage area in SD or a friends house would alleviate some of the tackle shipping anxiety? If you are doing 1 to 2 + trips per year I think it's worth it.
 
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Russ Scholl

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Apr 1, 2018
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Tuscaloosa
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Russ Scholl
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Kayaks
"I witnessed the care you put into packing your rods for the return to the East side. I was stressed watching." (Thanks so much for a good laugh this AM, John!)

Other's have commented on the process in past, with mixed opinions...

Stored everything in SD this time except some of the lighter rods. The reels travel with me ALWAYS & only as my overhead bin carry on! (Most of my reels were purchased at retail.)
Do you use a hard case for reel transport? If so which one?-Thanks
 
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bigreddog

Get off of my lawn
Jul 18, 2005
522
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San Diego Expat
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Cliff
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I always go back to the Royal Star
I used to fish long range from my home in Point Loma, but now I live far away and in a couple of different places. Reducing gear by choosing rods/reels that are multi-purpose made my life easier and less stressful-before, during, and after my trips. For me less is much more. Great report!
 
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Montaukmaniac

Thats my son, not me.
Feb 8, 2011
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Westchester NY
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Steve
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miss ion/fish on, "Wish on"
Do you use a hard case for reel transport? If so which one?-Thanks
I use a SOFT case for the reels. It's an old Nomad & will fit 12-14 reels with the stock soft section dividers, depending on size of the reels & quantity.

I use a "Plano Jumbo Arliner" rod tube.

Here's the Amazon link:

Amazon product



(Some years ago on BD SDLR someone alerted us that there was a sale & if my brain is working the cost was around $60.00.) It's got wheels at the back-end, a handle at the top end. (Very handy for getting around Airport terminals!) It will telescope to carry 8' rods & still meet the Alaska Air length parameters. AND best of all it will take a 12-13 rod quiver, depending on the guides! (Spinning rods first stripper guides are tricky. )

Here's how I pack the quiver...

[The rods are wrapped in a cardboard outer sleeve, in order to prevent them from slamming up against the plastic sides of the tube.( Inevitable by TSA, baggage & shipping handlers...) Inside the cardboard are Velcro straps which are holding bubble-wrap around the rods. Inside the bubble-wrap you will find more Velcro straps holding the rods together. The rods themselves are bunched together with more Velcro straps with all the guides pointed IN to the center. All rods are in rod sleeves made of woven PET material. This prevents them from being crushed by impact or the ceramic rings inside the metal guides from being cracked. Bubble-wrap is also between them, to prevent the guides from being damaged and crushed." ]

Hope this is helpful, Russ!
 
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