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FVSerenity

Tuna Boss FV HappyHours
  • Feb 27, 2012
    3,155
    2,324
    The Salt
    Name
    Rod
    Boat Name
    22' Duckworth FVSerenity, 2502 Trophy FVHappyHours
    driving a boat with very deep v, heavy chines and a lot of stability, in a following sea...

    So I have noticed the handling of a recent acquisition boat that it seems to get pushed by following seas more than my other boat. Which has a rounder less stable hull with a moderate v.

    When you are in following seas motoring along at say 20, at 45deg to the wave as it rolls under you it pushes the boat to change direction. If you try to fight the change it rolls the boat up on its side quite a bit because you are essentially turning with the wave. If you go with the change it levels the boat out but results in a significant direction change. Especially in very steep wind waves 3-4ft. That is what I have been doing because it seems safer and then I try to work back to the heading I want.

    I am curious what the more experienced captains out there have to say.

    Cat experience I would imagine is very similar!

    Appreciate your thoughts.
     
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    wdlfbio

    Once you go Cat, you never go back
    Sep 15, 2008
    10,156
    10,734
    Florida
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    Good
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    2021 Allied WildCat 30
    In my cat, I'm never cruising at 20. Slowest I run is 23 knots (and that's into, quartering or otherwise, the swells). When following, I've yet to run under 25 knots. I trim my motors independently to maintain a level bow in whichever sea condition I'm in. So if I have a following port sea, my port motor is trimmed down and stbd is up. In flat conditions it would cause my port bow to drive down but my stbd bow to rise. But when I have a following sea mommy port, it levels the boat as I go up and over the swells. No awkward bow steer. If I didn't trim this way, steering and comfort would suck.

    I absolutely LOVE a following 1/4ing sea.

    Maybe trim tabs are in order for the new boat.
     
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    KimH

    Someday I'll live the dream.
    Mar 4, 2009
    2,957
    3,183
    Tacoma/Westport WA/USA
    Name
    Kim
    Boat Name
    28' Farallon Walkaround "Paragon"
    As a general rule for stability regardless of hull, displacement, planing et cetera (not sure about cats) the most unstable position to have a sea is on the stern quarter. Sea lifts the stern, bow digs, sea pushes the stern causing bow steer (broach).

    When in a following sea are your trim tabs up? I understand they should be which is the way I always try to operate.
     
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    Sockeye71

    If it swims... we will hunt it down and club it!
    Jul 5, 2011
    961
    659
    Maple Valley
    Name
    Dave
    Boat Name
    Olympic 26' XLC "Sea Monkey"
    Quarter / or "stair-step" the swell if steep and close together in your stern.....and trim up bow a little more.

    remember....your engines power is your friend!!
     
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    Dash One

    Stand By
    Sep 18, 2008
    616
    1,097
    Anacortes, WA
    Name
    Jay
    Boat Name
    21’ Bayrunner Skiff
    Some boats just don't behave well in certain conditions. I have been on boats (well made, offshore models) that only wanted to lay on their chine in following sea/quartering conditions. No amount of trim could prevent that. Not fun.

    As others have said, trim can mitigate some or all of the undesirable characteristics. As Howard mentioned, sometimes it is more comfortable to make a tack - and take the long way to a destination - instead of wrestling with your boat.

    Jay
     
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    Chtucker

    Lowe boat denter
    Feb 15, 2012
    3,461
    2,376
    Sunshine State, AKA NOT.. Kirkland, WA
    Name
    Howard
    Boat Name
    Double Trouble 28' Armstrong
    Cattle Pass 2.jpg
    Here is where we had a pucker moment, First time we took water across the windows...
    My normal cruise at 3300rpm is 24knots, We were pushing against the tide at 4200 rpm at 18 knots. Instead of slogging on the yellow line trying to get out of their quickly, we should have either pointed west or took the green direction and not fought the current/wind so hard
     
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    FVSerenity

    Tuna Boss FV HappyHours
  • Feb 27, 2012
    3,155
    2,324
    The Salt
    Name
    Rod
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    22' Duckworth FVSerenity, 2502 Trophy FVHappyHours
    great info guy's adding to the problem was the fog, thick as soup, so I was going slow and the waves were having their way with me.
    I will definitely try a few of the techniques listed above, never tried to trim the engines separately to compensate, I will try the trim tab idea but ill have to put some tape over the sticker that says "don't use these in a following sea" im game, ill try it out (when its safe)
    Ive been kicking it for a few weeks now in the strait just to get a handle on how it handles before I head out of Westport:)
    I figured the CAT's might have similar issues.
    Yeah it definitely wants to lay on the chine, just trying to figure out how to mitigate that.
    but it is super stable and cuts the waves like no other, I guess the quest for the perfect boat continues, lol
     
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    wdlfbio

    Once you go Cat, you never go back
    Sep 15, 2008
    10,156
    10,734
    Florida
    Name
    Good
    Boat Name
    2021 Allied WildCat 30
    Tabs all the way down on a monohull with a following sea is generally a bad idea. Tends to lead to serious bow steer. But, one up and one down some may counteract your specific issue.
     
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    Ali

    Master of Nothing
    Admin
    Apr 24, 2003
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    Name
    That Guy
    Boat Name
    SeaVee 340Z
    Everyboat is different but I would try zero tab and see what that does. Then try 25% tab on the upswell side of the boat. Try and lean the boat a little into the swell. This should stop it from getting tossed around and give you a better track.

    Again, every hull will perform different and you need to figure out what your boat likes.
     
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    FVSerenity

    Tuna Boss FV HappyHours
  • Feb 27, 2012
    3,155
    2,324
    The Salt
    Name
    Rod
    Boat Name
    22' Duckworth FVSerenity, 2502 Trophy FVHappyHours
    Looking forward to trying these things out.
    I'llLet You know how it went

    Thanks!!
     
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    FVSerenity

    Tuna Boss FV HappyHours
  • Feb 27, 2012
    3,155
    2,324
    The Salt
    Name
    Rod
    Boat Name
    22' Duckworth FVSerenity, 2502 Trophy FVHappyHours
    Yeah, but you will need a new dentist to put all your teeth and fillings back, and a chiropractor to straighten you back out!
    Hah, I was going to say the same thing!
    My other boat does not do it either but you may need spinal decompression therapy if it's rough:)
     
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    Meanwhile

    Member
    Dec 13, 2005
    709
    198
    Warren, Oregon
    Name
    Randy Kane
    Boat Name
    2007 Grady White Marlin, 30.5', w/twin 250's
    I'm in the tabs all the way up, trim the engine to lift that bow. I don't know if my 4 blade props help but she handles following, quarter or not just fine.

    Meanwhile is a 30' Grady White.
     
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    G-Spot

    Captain
  • Mar 14, 2008
    5,555
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    Salem/OR/USA
    Name
    John
    Boat Name
    53’ Hatteras STEEL N TIME
    As was stated above every boat handles differently, the steepness of the hull is only one part of the equation. How heavy is the boat, how is the load balanced, is it generally bow heavy, are the crew way forward or standing in back, etc... Balancing load or shifting passengers on a smaller sport boat can help where the boat will dig. It will actually help trim the boat while tabs are raised.
     
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    fishbadger

    Member
  • Apr 6, 2012
    334
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    WA
    Name
    fishbadger
    Boat Name
    .Grady Gulfstream 232 "Herd of Turtles"
    I just fiddle with the tabs, but only slightly in a following/quartering sea. I've never screwed with differential motor trimming, maybe that's a cat thing. Might have to try it if things get weird some day. This 232 hull loves the sea behind it. And that spot at cattle does rather suck on a big runout!

    fb
     
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    Clockwork

    I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
    Feb 16, 2011
    2,544
    1,719
    covington, wa
    Name
    Ryan
    Boat Name
    GW Marlin
    Some things I do in a significant following sea:
    1) tabs up
    2) motors trimmed up
    3) move all unnecessary weight rearward if possible.
    4) try stay on the backside of the swell if you cant power through them
    5) if you go over the swell give it throttle as you surf down to get the bow up as you hit the backside of the next one.
    6) how you drive depends heavily on the conditions (swell size, interval, speed) in relation to how your specific boat handles. ie length, weight distribution, power/weight ratio. etc. takes time behind the sticks to learn a boats quirks.
     
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    Jasper H

    Team RED BEARD
    Dec 23, 2014
    746
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    Everett
    Name
    jasper
    Boat Name
    30’ Osprey
    We had a bad experience in Cattle Pass-

    What I "think" I have learned- It is better to take a less direct course than to try and force your boat a certain way.

    Agreed! Cattle pass had some of the steepest,nastiest, confused seas I have had my boat in.

    Reminded me of white water rafting the Wenatchee at flood stage.
     
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