Braid Marauder

JimmyK

Fisherman wannabe
Jun 1, 2009
1,345
153
63
Waipahu, Hawaii
Name
JimmyK
Boat
17' Seaswirl Striper CC, Krystana C.
Believe it or not some of it depends on your boat as to how fast they will optimally troll, and that I can'rt say without being there. I do know that when the long range boats out of San Diego troll, especially for wahoo, they are trolling at around 8 knots for the most part.

As for running baits at different levels, you have to remember that you are trying to run two completely different types of lures and get the best perfomance out of both. That simply doesn't work most of the time.

Again, my question is; How are you guys rigging the lure? I don't mean what with. I actually use the small ones for tuna in waters here where I'm not likely to encounter wahoo. I like medium size ones for everything else, but I have used the big ones a couple of times and I've never had the problems you guys are describing.

If you're looking for wahoo then the lure should ALWAYS be rigged with wire. But whether you are using mono, floro, or wire, it should always be attached to the lure in the same manner! If the lure doesn't run correctly after that it is possible to "tune" the lure to make it track straight.

Give me a sec and I'll try and get you a picture of what I'm talking about.
Baja Dreamer, You have me thinking now - I remember another thread I read about downriggers, and running the thinnest line possible. I'll bet that the leader I have on my Maurauder is too long (6'), and maybe too heavy, causing the wire to vibrate and shudder while running. Now I know why some guys recommend the single strand wire vice the stranded cable. Also, with this in mind, just gotta run the lure just below the surface to minimize the turbulence. I'll try this, and see what combo works, and report back. Hopefully still got ono left to catch! LOL
. If I'm wrong, someone correct me...Keep the suggestions coming, and thanks for the recommendation on the leader with the tong clip. Thanks for your help, and Tight Lines....
 

Vigilant32

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Nov 9, 2004
1,696
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2
Even with my crude old style rigging these were new before the trip started, and they stopped the boat eight times in one day.



Oh ya baby...




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kamikaze1

Newbie
Jul 26, 2010
66
0
6
Kaneohe, Hawaii
Name
NakZ
Boat
Kioko Maru
Sorry, didn't mean to post and run. Had to work today.

Here's a few pics of the lure, and the way that I have it set up. I bought it a couple years ago, so not sure what the size is. I'm guessing it's about 12". I normally pull it at about 8 knots. Also tried it in all different positions in the pattern.
 

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ahi lawaia

Member
Jan 17, 2008
384
57
28
Hawaii
Name
CP
Boat
Boston Whaler Conquest 21
Guys - IMHO, what affects the performance of lures like the Marauders out here, and hence affects the bite on them, is not the rigging at the lure but more significantly the fact that most guys run big reels with heavy mono main line. The heavy mono main line is used because we never know when a big ahi or marlin will bite, but the consequence of dragging that big diameter heavy mono is that a lure like the Marauder will not stay down or run as intended because the water pressure against the main line will push it up toward the surface and cause it to exaggerate its sideways movements. The mainland folks gracious enough to post suggestions probably use nothing larger than 50 class reels loaded with small diameter braided line so the performance of the Marauder is not significantly affected. Similarly, and I could be wrong, those locals who've had some success with the Marauders seem to be those who use lighter tackle and lighter line. As the K-5 TV guy says, "Think about it." Just my 2¢.
 

kamikaze1

Newbie
Jul 26, 2010
66
0
6
Kaneohe, Hawaii
Name
NakZ
Boat
Kioko Maru
Guys - IMHO, what affects the performance of lures like the Marauders out here, and hence affects the bite on them, is not the rigging at the lure but more significantly the fact that most guys run big reels with heavy mono main line. The heavy mono main line is used because we never know when a big ahi or marlin will bite, but the consequence of dragging that big diameter heavy mono is that a lure like the Marauder will not stay down or run as intended because the water pressure against the main line will push it up toward the surface and cause it to exaggerate its sideways movements. The mainland folks gracious enough to post suggestions probably use nothing larger than 50 class reels loaded with small diameter braided line so the performance of the Marauder is not significantly affected. Similarly, and I could be wrong, those locals who've had some success with the Marauders seem to be those who use lighter tackle and lighter line. As the K-5 TV guy says, "Think about it." Just my 2¢.
I agree with you. Growing up on the Big Island, my Dad and I never used anything bigger than 80# class rods and reels, filled with 80# mono. The biggest leader was 300#. IMO we got more strikes. Albeit we broke line a few times, but not at the fault of the gear. It was usually human error that caused the break. ie: not backing down when you should, or drag setting too high, stuff like that. Only after coming to Oahu have I been ridiculed for my choice of "light tackle". I've always fished with some way to fight the fish using the rod and reel. A gimble on the fish box, or a fighting chair. I've only now started to learn about using 130# class gear filled with 150# test or sometimes bigger. Fighting it in the rod holder and handlining the fish in. Don't get me wrong, I'm not knocking that style of fishing. Whatever works for you, I respect that. As long as there's blood on the decks!

Getting back to the subject. I've been pulling the Marauder around on mono ranging from 60# main to 100# with the same negative results. Changed the leader from 250# all the way down to 150#. Also pulled the same lure behind 5 different boats. Every single time, I get hits on the conventional style lures. Never a strike on the almighty marauder.

Oh well, I'll pull it around a few more times and see what happens. If lightning doesn't strike soon, you'll see it posted in the classifieds. Without a single scratch! :rofl:

Tight lines everyone!
 

Rubberhook2

Local Bluefin
Jan 19, 2007
5,185
695
113
San Clemente
Name
Tim
Boat
None
I always run mine on a 36 inch 275lb wire harness tied to 100lb mono. I don't need 100lb to land wahoo but occasionally big tuna will eat these and I like to run a tight drag to ensure a good hookset on the boney mouth of a wahoo.

I have found color is not as important as the swimming action, or vibration, the jig puts out. Some jigs will just troll better than others and those are the ones that consistently get bit.

The problem I found with the Marauders was that after a few fish, or getting slammed on the deck after landing the fish, the jig would no longer track straight behind the boat, pulling to one side or the other or completely popping out of the water. It is important they track perfectly straight behind the boat while being trolled and I have seen brand new jigs, never before fished, that will not do this. Correcting the problem requires "tuning" the jig by tweaking the metal eyes of the jig, one way or the other off center, where the wire harness and even the hooks attach. This can be a real pain in the ass to get right and takes away valuable fishing time if you are in a trolling rotation on a high spot on a long range boat for example. Again, the jig must track perfectly straight while being trolled to emit a vibration from the swimming action to consistently get bit.

Years ago I discovered a trolling lure similar to a Marauder that always swam straight and never required tuning no matter how many fish it caught or how many times it got slammed on a deck with a fish attached. It is called a Hooker Intruder and although I have caught many wahoo on a Marauder, I prefer the Hooker Intruders for the reasons mentioned above. Today this jig is difficult to find because for some unknown reason they stopped manufacturing it, but they can still be found for those who look for them. The black and purple, or "EggPlant" as they called it, has been my favorite and I have caught marlin, tuna, shark and wahoo all while trolling that jig.

Here are a couple of pics of the Intruders compared to a Marauder, some of the colors they came in, and a nice wahoo that decided to eat it...
 

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Baja Dreamer

Push the button Max!
Jul 2, 2004
1,748
5
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Bakersfield,Ca.
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Chris
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Baja Dreamer, You have me thinking now - I remember another thread I read about downriggers, and running the thinnest line possible. I'll bet that the leader I have on my Maurauder is too long (6'), and maybe too heavy, causing the wire to vibrate and shudder while running. Now I know why some guys recommend the single strand wire vice the stranded cable. Also, with this in mind, just gotta run the lure just below the surface to minimize the turbulence. I'll try this, and see what combo works, and report back. Hopefully still got ono left to catch! LOL
. If I'm wrong, someone correct me...Keep the suggestions coming, and thanks for the recommendation on the leader with the tong clip. Thanks for your help, and Tight Lines....
You're very welcome! :)

I suppose it's possible that the length of your leader could be causing you problems, but never having rigged one with that long a leader I have never encountered that as a problem. Another thing, while I don't personally like using the single strand wire for this there is certainly nothing wrong with trying it. The reason I like using the harness/clip type setup that I posted the pics to is that with a few harnesses made up or purchased, I can run almost any sort of swimming jig I want by just taking one off and puting another one on. That way I don't need to leader up everything seperately. ;)
 

Waiohinu Lawaia

dabuggashakeshakehenohemo
Sep 8, 2004
863
56
28
Los Angeles, or Big Island
Name
Jason
Boat
Sold it
We’ve been using marauders since I can remember (20 yrs maybe?) and they work great for Ono. We use the smaller ones for small ahi and otaru, but never caught anything other than onos on the bigger versions (granted we only use em on the ono run/ledge). We run about 6” of cable crimped (not looped) to 250lb mono. We run 130lb maxima on all of our 80stw’s. We troll the marauders at the same speed as our ono jets. Almost always have the marauders as our corner lures with two jets running long. Biggest problem we’ve had with ‘da feeesh’ is that it will get bit two to one, but the hookup ratio can be really bad sometimes, other times they swallow the whole damn thing!!! Do they work ? fak yeah! Are they the save all be all? Probably not… Do we ever troll for ono without at least one in the water? Rarely…
 

Baja Dreamer

Push the button Max!
Jul 2, 2004
1,748
5
38
60
Bakersfield,Ca.
Name
Chris
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None
Guys - IMHO, what affects the performance of lures like the Marauders out here, and hence affects the bite on them, is not the rigging at the lure but more significantly the fact that most guys run big reels with heavy mono main line. The heavy mono main line is used because we never know when a big ahi or marlin will bite, but the consequence of dragging that big diameter heavy mono is that a lure like the Marauder will not stay down or run as intended because the water pressure against the main line will push it up toward the surface and cause it to exaggerate its sideways movements. The mainland folks gracious enough to post suggestions probably use nothing larger than 50 class reels loaded with small diameter braided line so the performance of the Marauder is not significantly affected. Similarly, and I could be wrong, those locals who've had some success with the Marauders seem to be those who use lighter tackle and lighter line. As the K-5 TV guy says, "Think about it." Just my 2¢.
Ya' know, I hadn't really thought abut this, but I think you might be onto something here with your line of thinking, although possibly for the wrong reason. Allow me to explain.

The size of the reel used to troll with has nothing at all to do with the way a lure will or won't run, but it IS true that the size of the line/leader can and will on most lures. That is a given. Now please understand, us mainlanders do occasionally use larger reels than 50 wides but that is most often done when kite fishing or trolling in a big marlin tournament. For those of us who fish long range, a 50W is a big reel and is what many of use use for trolling. (Although some do actually use Penn 70's or many other maker's 80's, especially when fishing big baits for big tuna!) But personaly speaking, my hot rodded Penn 50SW is loaded with 600 yards of 200 lb. braided line and I'll use it with up to a 300 lb. topshot when I fish the kite. For trolling I'll generally use a 200 lb. topshot on long trips, and I like to use a long enough topshot when trolling that my spectra isn't in the water at all while I'm trolling. That's pretty heavy line right there, and I've seen the large size Marauders rigged up with as heavy as 400 lb. cable and still get bit very well.

But here is the difference I see in the trolling.

When trolling on a long range boat, the rods are suspended on clips from a harness attached to the rail, giving the trolling lines a shallower angle of entry into the water than they would get by being placed in a rod holder and pointing up in the air. Having the "spring action" from the trolling rod possibly affecting the lure is also eliminated by trolling in this manner.

When we troll Marauders for wahoo from a long range boat, the drop back on the lure can be unbelievably short at times and they still get bit like crazy but the lines are still entering the water at a relatively shallow angle.

If you guys over are using the heavy gear as you say, (And that's very understanable given your catch possiblilties.), you may indeed be corect about the drag on the heavy line/leader causing too much drag for the jig to run properly, because of the angle the line is entering the water, especially if you are trolling them close.

I wonder if using a flat line clip to reduce the angle of entry into the water might help this any? Anyone?
 

Baja Dreamer

Push the button Max!
Jul 2, 2004
1,748
5
38
60
Bakersfield,Ca.
Name
Chris
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None
We’ve been using marauders since I can remember (20 yrs maybe?) and they work great for Ono. We use the smaller ones for small ahi and otaru, but never caught anything other than onos on the bigger versions (granted we only use em on the ono run/ledge). We run about 6” of cable crimped (not looped) to 250lb mono. We run 130lb maxima on all of our 80stw’s. We troll the marauders at the same speed as our ono jets. Almost always have the marauders as our corner lures with two jets running long.
As you may know, the corners tend to get bit better when trolling for wahoo on the long range boats too. But when using the small model for tuna, (Like the old sardine pattern in my pics.), I've had just as much luck in the center spots, and they always ran OK with everything from feathers to cedar plugs being trolled at the same time. That's why I'm so mystified by the problems some folks here have had with them.

Biggest problem we’ve had with ‘da feeesh’ is that it will get bit two to one, but the hookup ratio can be really bad sometimes, other times they swallow the whole damn thing!!! Do they work ? fak yeah!
Ok, about the hookup ratio, I gotta ask; How much drag are you using at strike? When trolling for wahoo on the long range boats the rule of thumb has always been to "keep a tight drag, but not stupid tight". This generally means a strike drag setting of between 20 and 25 lbs.

You've probably also heard the stories of how often a wahoo gets wound right to the boat on trolling gear, is gaffed and brought in the boat, and all without ever having the hook in it's mouth! ;)

Are they the save all be all? Probably not… Do we ever troll for ono without at least one in the water? Rarely…
Having at least one in the water most of the time says a lot about the lure right there! :)
 

waimalu

Newbie
May 12, 2009
28
1
0
Kailua, Hawaii USA
Name
Waimalu
Boat
33' Blackfin Flybridge
Aloha,
I agree with Pat, in years past these have been effective lures. This year hasn't been a banner Ono year (at least for me). I like to run these closer to the boat off the corners. I will clip them or rubber band them down from the stern cleat on either side of the transom to change the running angle and get them to run in the clear on the side of the wake. In this setup, they are run close to the boat - no more than 20' back on or inside the first wave. I definitely subscribe to them as effective attractants as I tend to get more strikes on the other lures when I run one. The commotion and depth seems to bring the fish up.

Strangest catch to date on one was a 300lb marlin that decided he couldn't resist.
 

Baja Dreamer

Push the button Max!
Jul 2, 2004
1,748
5
38
60
Bakersfield,Ca.
Name
Chris
Boat
None
I always run mine on a 36 inch 275lb wire harness tied to 100lb mono. I don't need 100lb to land wahoo but occasionally big tuna will eat these and I like to run a tight drag to ensure a good hookset on the boney mouth of a wahoo.
Eeezakly so! SOP! :)

I have found color is not as important as the swimming action, or vibration, the jig puts out. Some jigs will just troll better than others and those are the ones that consistently get bit.
I agree with this as well, particularly in my casting jigs.

The problem I found with the Marauders was that after a few fish, or getting slammed on the deck after landing the fish, the jig would no longer track straight behind the boat, pulling to one side or the other or completely popping out of the water. It is important they track perfectly straight behind the boat while being trolled and I have seen brand new jigs, never before fished, that will not do this. Correcting the problem requires "tuning" the jig by tweaking the metal eyes of the jig, one way or the other off center, where the wire harness and even the hooks attach. This can be a real pain in the ass to get right and takes away valuable fishing time if you are in a trolling rotation on a high spot on a long range boat for example. Again, the jig must track perfectly straight while being trolled to emit a vibration from the swimming action to consistently get bit.
I agree with this to a certain extent, but this can happen to almost ANY swimming type trolling lure. All the "rapala type" lures were notorious for this. But let's be honest here a sec. Trolling jigs like this aren't meant to be whacked on the deck many times before a fish is subdued, and they aren't meant to be smacked a couple of times with the fish bat while the fish is being subdued either. (I've seen this happen many times!) But stuff will happen in anycase. That's just how it is.

A good friend of mine who is also a poster here, (fishybuzz) was on a trip rcently where he started out with a brand new large size Marauder. This thing worked so well that the skipper asked that it be in the water on EVERY trolling rotation! Fishy said he stopped counting how many 'hoos this thing caught after about 40 or so. By the time the trip was over, there was hardly any paint left on it, it had been re-re-rigged several times with new 400 lb. cable to get rid of the frayed strands, and it was slammed by fish every time it went in the water. I don't recall him saying that he needed to tune it even once.

Years ago I discovered a trolling lure similar to a Marauder that always swam straight and never required tuning no matter how many fish it caught or how many times it got slammed on a deck with a fish attached. It is called a Hooker Intruder and although I have caught many wahoo on a Marauder, I prefer the Hooker Intruders for the reasons mentioned above. Today this jig is difficult to find because for some unknown reason they stopped manufacturing it, but they can still be found for those who look for them. The black and purple, or "EggPlant" as they called it, has been my favorite and I have caught marlin, tuna, shark and wahoo all while trolling that jig.
That's funny, I found one like that too, but they're still making it last time I checked! ;)

Here are a couple of pics of the Intruders compared to a Marauder, some of the colors they came in, and a nice wahoo that decided to eat it...




These look awfully similar to yours but they're still making these. :rolleyes:




These are Braid Flashdancers. They've been making these since '88 or '89, and they still catch fish! :)



Another "swiming" type trolling jig that many aren't aware are these little guys right here.




These are Braid Tuna Whackers, and they've been around since the early '90's. I used to think they were some of the funniest looking trolling lures I'd ever seen, but now I'm hearing that the folks down in Texas love 'em for offshore use.......

.......and they catch a lot of wahoo on these too!
 

Baja Dreamer

Push the button Max!
Jul 2, 2004
1,748
5
38
60
Bakersfield,Ca.
Name
Chris
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None
Aloha,
I agree with Pat, in years past these have been effective lures. This year hasn't been a banner Ono year (at least for me). I like to run these closer to the boat off the corners. I will clip them or rubber band them down from the stern cleat on either side of the transom to change the running angle and get them to run in the clear on the side of the wake. In this setup, they are run close to the boat - no more than 20' back on or inside the first wave. I definitely subscribe to them as effective attractants as I tend to get more strikes on the other lures when I run one. The commotion and depth seems to bring the fish up.

Strangest catch to date on one was a 300lb marlin that decided he couldn't resist.
That is EZACTLY what I was talking about in response to ahi lawaia above!

Thank you! :)
 

patfishhi

Registered User
Sep 20, 2007
3,680
996
113
60
Oahu
Name
Pat
Boat
32' Blackfin "Kai Nana"
I wonder if using a flat line clip to reduce the angle of entry into the water might help this any? Anyone?
Since we've been running marauders (or the like) have always flatlined them, even if running off the corner rod. Typical set up, 80# main line, standard swivel, 300# leader, crimped with either a plastic or stainless thimble. That's the only difference in rigging is the thimble; whereas on the regular lures just use the standard leader protector material and the only reason is the aggressive action of the lures, need something more than the typical leader protector. As far as trolling speed, nothing different than the norm (7-9 kts).

A side question; the braid runner lures, love the action, but the holes wear out on the lure body. I could see the need to troll them slower BUT the other lures in the pattern then are less effective; thoughts?

Thanks
Pat
 

da reel man

Newbie
Jan 22, 2008
389
0
0
hawaii
Name
cuz
Boat
21 alii kai
do not i repeat do not use straight mono it will chafe and you will lose your lure happened to me shhhhhhhhh. the one i used was trolled in the center (short) with out a problem or a hit for that matter either lol
 

Baja Dreamer

Push the button Max!
Jul 2, 2004
1,748
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Bakersfield,Ca.
Name
Chris
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None
Since we've been running marauders (or the like) have always flatlined them, even if running off the corner rod. Typical set up, 80# main line, standard swivel, 300# leader, crimped with either a plastic or stainless thimble. That's the only difference in rigging is the thimble; whereas on the regular lures just use the standard leader protector material and the only reason is the aggressive action of the lures, need something more than the typical leader protector. As far as trolling speed, nothing different than the norm (7-9 kts).

Good deal Pat! I'm glad to see that there are a few doing it right or at least trying something different to make things work! ;)


A side question; the braid runner lures, love the action, but the holes wear out on the lure body. I could see the need to troll them slower BUT the other lures in the pattern then are less effective; thoughts?

Thanks
Pat
Hmmm, good question. This is the first time I've heard of that being a problem however they do have a pretty hard action though with lots of vibration!

I know that the rated trolling depths for the hole placements are for trolling speeds of 8 to 11 knots so your trolling speed shouldn't be a problem. I know they will also troll well at slower speeds but I see your point about the other lures in the spread. The only thing that comes to mind there is something I said earlier. (Or possibly in another thread.) Not all jigs are compatable enough to be run together.

I don't think that it's anything to do with the way you have them rigged though. If it was something you did that was causing that it would probably have affected that action and you'd have noticed it. I can't think of anything that would cause premature wear on the holes though, but if I had to guess I'd say that there would be more wear on the ones used for a deeper depth due to them pulling harder to maintain depth. Is that possibly the case?
 

kamikaze1

Newbie
Jul 26, 2010
66
0
6
Kaneohe, Hawaii
Name
NakZ
Boat
Kioko Maru
Thanks for all of the info guys. Appreciate it. Next time out, I'm going to run it on the short corner, clipped down and see what happens.
 

Vigilant32

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Nov 9, 2004
1,696
776
113
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2
Good luck Wade, I hope you hook up.

There are many ways to intice that strike, but you will never know until you give them a try.

I noticed that the jigs I have had the most success using were a little more stream lined than the standard muraders.

I have always been told that running jigs short, almost in the prop wash will get bit. I always keep one in the spread there, but over time have found that my best strikes come to the jig that is the furthest back in the pattern.

Party boat crews hate when I drop back behind.