Boat Upgrade Options

Discussion in 'Washington Fishing Reports' started by Jasongind, Dec 8, 2018.

  1. EJ Swanny

    EJ Swanny I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Redondo/WA
    Name:
    Erik
    Boat:
    "Riley-J" 2006 21' Proline Tourney
    • Messages:
      (2,512)
    • Likes Received:
      (1,233)
    Congratulations on deciding to pull the trigger. This will open up a ton of new opportunities for you and your family to make some more, great memories. I would lean 85% to fishing/crabbing and large seas/overnight comfort, and 15% to freshwater tubing/skiing. Hell, a small skif or container ship can pull a tube. This last summer we used our boat for fishing/crabbing/shrimping/tubing/overnighting.

    Remember, safety of family is first and foremost. Personally I would go for something in the 21'-24' range. Easy to trailer, has a decent cuddy to spend the night, and can handle some snotty seas. You can stretch that 65K alot more if you buy slightly used.

    Goodluck, and have fun with the search, I'm looking forward to see your choice.
     
  2. Polarbill1999

    Polarbill1999 Newbie

    Location:
    Snohomish, WA
    Name:
    Brett Yates
    Boat:
    1996 Arima Sea Chaser
    • Messages:
      (35)
    • Likes Received:
      (19)
    The hardtop vs soft top tradeoff is tough. Both options would be great for fishing. The soft top will be able to be a watersports boat and do some good weather cruising/camping. The hardtop will be a better cruising/camping boat but I just can't imagine using a hardtop much for water sports. You would want to think about how you would use the boat a majority of the time and choose the best fit.

    I don't think the soft top is an issue leaking, especially of cruising/camping will be when the weather is nicer but that is just me.

    A dual console like the grady mentioned or any other brand would be nice on the watersports/fishing side but I don't see how it could be used for cruiaing/camping.

    I personally don't like walkarounds for a family boat. You basically get 2 good visibility seats and others are either in the weather or sitting on low back facing seats. In my opinion only good for fishing 2 people or cruising as a couple.

    If the watersports side is a low priority another boat I would look at is an arima. They make a 16, 17, 19, 21 and 22 foot versions. The 19, 21 and 22 some in soft top, hard top (more of a pilothouse) and skip top (like a grady with fiberglass top and soft windows). A 19 or 21 soft or hard top are great fiahing boats. They also have nice cuddys for 2. I really like how open the deck is on them and that the floor is all flat. It is easy to have 3 or 4 people all sitting together, out of the weather. The have made them for quite a few years and still are made (in Bremerton). They are light so easy to tow and they don't need big power. They are easy to manage. They are extremely stable (they can be rough riding in chop but you can run on plane down to about 10-12mph so just slow down).

    Also, not sure if you have CO sidered this but if you trade in you get the tax savings. You will save about 2k in tax on your purchase so calculate that into things.

    I agree with others on buying used if possible, but I don't have any idea your financial situation. If you can truly figure out what you want, are going to use it and can afford it, then go for it.
     
  3. Jasongind

    Jasongind Member

    Location:
    Federal Way, WA
    Name:
    Jason
    Boat:
    Bayliner175BR
    • Messages:
      (326)
    • Likes Received:
      (239)
    We looked into a few Arimas last year as I thought the 22' Sea Legend would be perfect for us. Once we were on them (checked out 3 different configurations) we realized very quick they wouldn't work too well for us. I'm only 5'9" and couldn't stand all the way up in it, was really cramped and the back deck seemed smaller than any other 22' we checked out.

    I have considered the tax value on a trade, which is nice to off set some of the cost. I do have an offer to get $20k for my boat if I purchase a new Defiance 220EX. Which is a good deal but $78k is just a bit out of my price range still.

    I'll have to try and unload this Bayliner and go from there.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2018
  4. Wild Bill

    Wild Bill Drinking the Suzuki Kool-aid and liking it!

    Location:
    Camano Island
    Name:
    Steve
    Boat:
    Otter Craft
    • Messages:
      (3,197)
    • Likes Received:
      (2,984)
    Here is a bit of advice worth exactly what you paid fior it. Hang onto current boat and make it work until it is paid off. By then a better picture of your needs will come clear without being upside down trying to peddle current boat. Then you will be in a better position to deal on the next boat whether it is new or used.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2018
    Siv, Odin7, MA9 and 2 others like this.
  5. Titan

    Titan I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Sammamish/WA/USA
    Name:
    Kamen
    Boat:
    Dinghy
    • Messages:
      (1,920)
    • Likes Received:
      (828)
    Sounds like you've dug yourself into a hole. My advice is to stop digging.
     
    Chasin' Tail and MA9 like this.
  6. Jasongind

    Jasongind Member

    Location:
    Federal Way, WA
    Name:
    Jason
    Boat:
    Bayliner175BR
    • Messages:
      (326)
    • Likes Received:
      (239)
    If I couldn't afford to pay the difference and an increased monthly payment I wouldn't even consider it. I'll be more than Ok doing both.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2018
  7. stank

    stank Well-Known "Member"

    Location:
    Norwalk, CA
    Name:
    Dave
    Boat:
    None
    • Messages:
      (660)
    • Likes Received:
      (468)
    Well then it’s easy, just buy what you want now, and sell the bowrider in the spring when the market is better.
     
    Elkfins likes this.
  8. Elkfins

    Elkfins Ungrateful Prick

    Location:
    Tacoma, WA
    Name:
    Steve
    Boat:
    "Cleanup Required" '99 Grady White 232 Gulfstream
    • Messages:
      (4,220)
    • Likes Received:
      (3,071)
    Wrong time of year to sell that boat. Come March, April or May, it should go quickly. I'd wait until then.
     
  9. Swede

    Swede Yachtless

    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    Name:
    Swede
    Boat:
    Kristen Lee
    • Messages:
      (4,097)
    • Likes Received:
      (4,595)
    A few notes: Big difference in bottom widths between models. Searunner is narrow. A Searunner probably isn’t setup from factory to handle year-round moorage. You'll need to rectify that. Uncle Bob ain't cheap.
     
  10. Polarbill1999

    Polarbill1999 Newbie

    Location:
    Snohomish, WA
    Name:
    Brett Yates
    Boat:
    1996 Arima Sea Chaser
    • Messages:
      (35)
    • Likes Received:
      (19)
    The newer searunner aren't as narrow as the older ones. 96" beam and 78" bottom.
     
    Jasongind likes this.
  11. Jasongind

    Jasongind Member

    Location:
    Federal Way, WA
    Name:
    Jason
    Boat:
    Bayliner175BR
    • Messages:
      (326)
    • Likes Received:
      (239)
    I don't see why I couldn't get it bottom painted and Moore it like any other boat. There is a Searunner 210 moored at Des Moines just fine.
     
  12. Jasongind

    Jasongind Member

    Location:
    Federal Way, WA
    Name:
    Jason
    Boat:
    Bayliner175BR
    • Messages:
      (326)
    • Likes Received:
      (239)
    I thought about it and discussed it with the wife. She doesn't understand the need for two boats. I dnt understand the need for 8 purses though, to each their own lol.
     
    Elkfins and xtshawytscha like this.
  13. FishPimpII

    FishPimpII Dreaming about the next boat...

    Location:
    Seattle, Wa
    Name:
    Jeff Nelson
    Boat:
    Deckhand of "JuiceboxII" now that the FishpimpII is sold
    • Messages:
      (1,801)
    • Likes Received:
      (1,791)
    They are saying you could for sure do that with the right precautions. And one of the guys on here Omakase (Bob) is great at it.
    It’s just expensive to get good work like he does done and you probably would want to add more sacrificial anodes in addition to the painting so that’s more additional cost to figure in...
    sounds like you are gearing up for a fun adventure and everyone here is rooting for it to work out... we just all like to spend other people’s money and give tons of “free” advice.
     
  14. Jasongind

    Jasongind Member

    Location:
    Federal Way, WA
    Name:
    Jason
    Boat:
    Bayliner175BR
    • Messages:
      (326)
    • Likes Received:
      (239)
    Ah gotcha. I appreciate all the "free" advice, the wife doesn't so much though lol.
     
  15. LJB

    LJB Down Fur-Lined Avenue

    Location:
    Tacoma
    Name:
    ain't no cunthead
    Boat:
    68 Bellboy
    • Messages:
      (1,427)
    • Likes Received:
      (617)
    I would be very leary **Edit never finished what I planed to say.. **
    Does she understand fresh cut Christmas trees aren't selling in the summer,,
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2018
    Elkfins and jbuck like this.
  16. TonyG

    TonyG I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Snohomish, WA
    Name:
    Tony
    Boat:
    NR Seahawk OS 26'; 20' Alumaweld Super Vee Sled
    • Messages:
      (2,751)
    • Likes Received:
      (2,441)
    Personal opinion but I would not do extended moorage of a non self-bailer. I also would not take a non self-bailer with open bow way offshore. I know people do both of these things. I would not.

    I had an alumaweld 22' intruder with the OS bracket. Cool boat but open bow and not self bailing. In fair weather it was nice it was a pleasure to fish from. Large deck. In rough weather, it was not so good. All these designs move the helm/cabin quite forward to make room for the dance floor. It is the right trade off but this results in a rough ride. All vary. Of these designs, I'd choose the NR Seahawk as the best built.

    I'd definitely be patient and look used.
     
    rickstah and Odin7 like this.
  17. Jasongind

    Jasongind Member

    Location:
    Federal Way, WA
    Name:
    Jason
    Boat:
    Bayliner175BR
    • Messages:
      (326)
    • Likes Received:
      (239)
    The Searunner I saw moored was covered moorage. I also don't need to moore all year as I can store at home. Summer time moorage would be great as Redondo Boat launch gets busy to where I've gone down there but there was no where to park so had to go home. Plus I work nights and I get off at 0400. If it's moored in the summer I can go straight after work on my way home a lot easier.

    I have never been out to sea and don't know the first thing about it. I have no plans to go in my boat so if I do it will be on someone else's boat who knows what they are doing, hopefully lol.

    We just need a boat for the inner Sound (MA 10-11), take from Des Moines to Bainbridge, Poulsbo and other day trip destinations. We also like to go to the lake and hang out with the kids and tube. We don't need a 24'+ OS boat.
     
    FVSerenity likes this.
  18. Captain Decent

    Captain Decent I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    Covington, wa
    Name:
    Ryan
    Boat:
    The Bert Makes ’em Squirt
    • Messages:
      (1,161)
    • Likes Received:
      (1,562)
    Women just don't understand the math behind us needing multiple boats. It's science and stuff.
     
  19. Swede

    Swede Yachtless

    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    Name:
    Swede
    Boat:
    Kristen Lee
    • Messages:
      (4,097)
    • Likes Received:
      (4,595)
    You should totally ignore all the “free“ advice. We’ll need a good winter thread next year. LOL
     
    South Sounder and Jasongind like this.
  20. Deviant

    Deviant I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    WA
    Name:
    Tim
    Boat:
    Bounty 293 "KRAKEN"
    • Messages:
      (1,482)
    • Likes Received:
      (632)
    Boat upgrade options....If I had options to choose from:
    Self bailing deck, hard top for the PNW, shitter for her and kids (one with a door is a plus), heat source for the cold days, second steering station so you can fish with family and friends.
    Beam width/length so you have a stable platform. Dependable power with a back-up (kicker or twins).
    A light boat vs heavy is debatable as well as aluminum vs fiberglass.
    Go too big, you will need a comparable tow rig, permits and moorage. Too small you can be limited to only good weather and inshore. Too light you have a bumpy ride. Too heavy you might get crappy fuel burn (depending on your drivetrain). Too small of a fuel tank will limit your range, etc....
    List can go on and on. IMO - There is no perfect boat! They all have their merits and short comings.
     
    FVSerenity, Jasongind and EJ Swanny like this.

Share This Page