Best way to prep a Yellowtail?

Discussion in 'Fishing Chit Chat' started by jiminoc, Sep 1, 2006.

  1. madscientist

    madscientist ?

    Location:
    La Jolla, CA
    Name:
    Brad
    Boat:
    kayak
    • Messages:
      (799)
    • Likes Received:
      (5)
    A couple things I've noticed about bleeding on the yak. The sooner you bleed the better, as the fish's heart is still pumping. As soon as I get one stringered I hack two gills on either side and watch the blood squirt. Second thing, bleed out of the water. Fish blood clots in water faster than air.

    I didn't know the other stuff about icing for 24hrs. Very interesting.
     
  2. Mean-Machine

    Mean-Machine Newbie

    Location:
    socal
    Name:
    Mean-Machine
    Boat:
    someday
    • Messages:
      (660)
    • Likes Received:
      (1)
    I go to the 99 cent store and buy cheap kitchen scissors. If the water is very choppy it's easier and safer to cut the gills with scissors then trying to cut with a knife or cutting a single gill with a plier tool.
     
  3. fishmanbh

    fishmanbh World Class Shark Fishing

    Location:
    San Diego and Los Angeles
    Name:
    Brian
    Boat:
    www.worldclasssharkfishing.com
    • Messages:
      (872)
    • Likes Received:
      (60)
    yep, bleed them while still alive and out of the water with an occational dooshing if the blood clots. all that ice info is a++ too! oh yeah and never leave a filet in fresh(ice) water overnite.
     
  4. steelfish

    steelfish the BBB, Baja Bass Boy..

    Location:
    Calexico, Ca / BAJA,Mexico
    Name:
    Alex
    Boat:
    Boatless
    • Messages:
      (722)
    • Likes Received:
      (245)
    wow, old thread but really interesting info, I will have to put on practice lots of the info
     
  5. carterantebi

    carterantebi I hate fishing

    Location:
    Coronado
    Name:
    Carter
    Boat:
    Pacific Queen!
    • Messages:
      (575)
    • Likes Received:
      (505)
    If we're going to resurrect this thread, I must add:

    After ripping gills or slitting the throat, do a cut on each side right by the tail. It'll release all the lactic acid built up. When you fight a fish to the boat, it puts a lot of stress on the fish and there will be a lot of lactic acid in the meat. This often leads to fish tensing up and you'll find them stuck in a certain position after dying. A spike also helps with that. You just want the fish to be relaxed as possible.
     
  6. kindafishy

    kindafishy I've posted enough I should edit this section

    Location:
    hemet/ca/riverside
    Name:
    SCOTT
    Boat:
    bayliner cierra express 2452 "RYLEE'S WAVE RYDER"
    • Messages:
      (3,957)
    • Likes Received:
      (1,705)
    ^^^ i think your wrong about this....a salt water and ice combo gets below freezing of straight freshwater (ice). if you've ever made homemade ice cream you'll remember adding salt to the ice. without salt you'll never get ice cream, just a milkshake.
     
    stangclassic66 likes this.
  7. matt86m

    matt86m Not worthy of a Title

    Location:
    Fountain Valley, CA
    Name:
    Matt
    Boat:
    20' Tiara Pursuit
    • Messages:
      (2,321)
    • Likes Received:
      (613)
    Spike em and bleed them in a bucket then get them on ice.

    Look up Ike Jime on youtube and if you need a spike let me know
     
  8. stangclassic66

    stangclassic66 USCG Master

    Location:
    San Diego/SF Bay
    Name:
    Capt. Erik
    Boat:
    25' Parker
    • Messages:
      (1,125)
    • Likes Received:
      (610)
    Salt water brine without a chiller will still get down to 32 degrees and that is better than just ice alone. Commercial salmon fishermen that don't have refrigeration still do it this way and deliver sashimi grade salmon. We do the same for Albacore up north after spiking, bleeding, and gutting. Same great quality.

    And since i've moved down here, I do the same for every species of fish i've caught, including wahoo, yft, bft, yt, etc.

    If you keep them in the brine for more than a day, you have to add rock salt to keep the temps down because the salt that was in there initially gets sucked into the fish. That's why it's nice and firm when you fillet brine kept fish.

    Up in half moon bay, for $20 we could get 500lbs of flake ice blown right into our fish holds. I'm still blown away that san diego does NOT have this amenity given the 10x fold fish yield we get compared to norcal. When I go to the ice store here, i have to pay upwards of $30 for 200lbs... and my buddies from here are blown away that I want so much ice. Shake my head everytime I see pictures of 3 limits of yellowtail and a 20lb bag of ice sitting on top.... garbage quality yellowtail....all that money spent to go fishing for chinatown quality fish.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2018
  9. yakdout

    yakdout Professional

    Location:
    San Diego
    Name:
    Brandon
    Boat:
    s and hoes
    • Messages:
      (1,152)
    • Likes Received:
      (1,365)
    Where are you getting 200lbs of ice for $30?
     
  10. cvjarrod

    cvjarrod Freshie

    Location:
    Chula Vista
    Name:
    Jarrod
    Boat:
    24 Diesel Skipjack Flybridge
    • Messages:
      (748)
    • Likes Received:
      (153)
    WRONG!
    Frozen ice is at MINIMUM 32 degrees Fahrenheit. It can be cooled to whatever temperature you want. You want -100 degree Fahrenheit ice, break out the liquid nitrogen and it would be EASY.

    You are also incorrect as to how cold the mixture will get with salt added. It's not the ice that decreases in temperature but rather the water. With salt added the water can be kept at less than 32 degrees Fahrenheit. You haven't changed the amount of heat you can transfer from the fish, NOT EVEN A LITTLE. You've just transferred energy from the water to the ice, increasing the temperature of the ice and if it gets to 32 degrees Fahrenheit, ice will be melted.

    Bottom line is if the water drains from your kill bags or boxes, you have essentially heated up the ice by adding salt so you can discharge the water. You have accomplished EXACTLY what you don't want.

    You haven't changed the overall amount of heat you can transfer from the fish. It's simple thermodynamics (And yes, I am a physicist). You can't create or destroy energy. You can only transfer it.

    Sorry guys, salt has no magic properties. It follows the same rules of physics as EVERYTHING ELSE.

    I take about 300 pounds of ice in two kill bags per trip. Another 40 pounds goes into a cooler. If you are using a kill bag like me, the water is being drained from the seams constantly. Using salt just melts your ice faster under those conditions.

     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  11. kimorb

    kimorb Newbie

    Location:
    Golden Hill
    Name:
    Richard Baldwin
    Boat:
    I wish
    • Messages:
      (133)
    • Likes Received:
      (13)
    So why does adding salt to ice allow me to freeze icecream mixture but just ice alone does not ? Why is sticking my hand in the fish hold that is just melted ice (and thus fresh water only) unpleasant but in a bag of ice and salty seawater physically painful from the cold while you fish around trying to remove the drain plug? You are getting a colder temperature.
     
  12. yakdout

    yakdout Professional

    Location:
    San Diego
    Name:
    Brandon
    Boat:
    s and hoes
    • Messages:
      (1,152)
    • Likes Received:
      (1,365)
    Only time I add raw water to the fish bag is if We dont have enough ice. Salt just lowers the freezing temperature of water and melts the ice. The temperature of the water is not colder than if you were to have an ample amount of ice. But you can get more volume of cold water ice mix by adding salt, which is what we usually do.
     
    stangclassic66 likes this.
  13. shinbob

    shinbob Member

    Location:
    Pasadena
    Name:
    Shin
    Boat:
    Triton 240 LTS
    • Messages:
      (122)
    • Likes Received:
      (219)
    Aren't you getting heat absorption from the phase change that occurs when the ice melts at the lowered freezing point? That should reduce the overall temperature somewhat, I would think. But I think the real reason it feels colder is the contact area between water (lots) and ice cubes (less) allows quicker heat transfer from your hand (or the fish). Just like chilling your beer bottles in ice water vs. ice cubes...
     
  14. MYNomad

    MYNomad Heading South

    Location:
    Pacific Northwest / West Coast Mexico
    Name:
    Rick
    Boat:
    Yes
    • Messages:
      (3,067)
    • Likes Received:
      (2,443)
    With all my fish, well not rock cod but at least tuna, dorado and yellows, I begin by gaffing in the head / gills. I try really hard not to get them in the stomach. Second is bleeding without letting the fish flop around. I typically make an incision behind the pectoral fin and throw them in a tank that has new seawater continuously flowing in. I will let them bleed for up to 30 minutes before I start to worry about moving on to the next step. With tuna, which I am more likely to eat raw, I will cut back on that time, but with yellows (which I rarely eat raw, and dodos, which I never eat raw, I am Ok with even 60 minutes). Anyway, when the time is right, after they have fully bled out, I pull them out of the bleed tank and remove the guts and gills. Especially on tuna, I don't cut the fish at all, except to make an incission around the anus so that all the guts can be pulled out threw the gill plate without any damage to edible tissue. Next, I throw them into a saltwater brine bath, which cools them down to way below 32F (may 20F) very quickly. I will leave the fish in there for 2 or three days, but if I am on a longer trip than that, after a day or two, I will pull the fish out and put them in a big plastic bag -- I bought a long roll of 4mil tubular plastic. I tie a knot in one end, put the fish in, get most of the air out and tie a knot in the other end. Then I throw that bagged up fish on ice, keeping lots of ice packed around all the fish. I don't filet the fish before I am ready to cut individual portions, which I vacuum pack (also with 4mil plastic) and freeze. About the only way I can see to improve my technique would be to buy an industrial / commercial freezer to keep the fish frozen at a much lower temp than the 4 degrees (as I recall) that my boat's freezer and home freezer's maintain.
     
    stangclassic66 likes this.
  15. stangclassic66

    stangclassic66 USCG Master

    Location:
    San Diego/SF Bay
    Name:
    Capt. Erik
    Boat:
    25' Parker
    • Messages:
      (1,125)
    • Likes Received:
      (610)
    I don't fish with shitty ass fish bags like you sport only guys do. I fish with commercial half totes and bonners that will hold ice or slush brine for 3-4 days or more. I've also commercial fished salmon and have retained 32 degree slush/water in said half totes for 5 days. yes at sea for 5 days. yes that's how its' been done for over 50 years.

    I honestly don't care that you're a physicist, no offense, i just don't. I just know how to take care of my fish and keep my commercial coolers chilled with slush at 32 degrees for more than a few days. And no, i don't change out the water and add salt to start the process over and over. I keep it a nice thick slush from the get go.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
    bman440440 likes this.
  16. MYNomad

    MYNomad Heading South

    Location:
    Pacific Northwest / West Coast Mexico
    Name:
    Rick
    Boat:
    Yes
    • Messages:
      (3,067)
    • Likes Received:
      (2,443)
    And, FWIW, regarding the controversy about saltwater ice, here is my take. Saltwater freezes, changes state, at a much lower temperature then freshwater. The exact temperature at which it freezes depends on how salty the water is. Ocean water freezes at somewhere around 20F. So, lets say you have 100 pounds (or any arbitrarily large amount) of freshwater ice that is just a tad below 32 degrees. So, at that temperature, it is ice, not liquid. Let's say you and a bunch of saltwater -- for the sake of example, 30 pounds of saltwater. And let's say that saltwater was the same temperature as the ice, ie, just below 32. But since it is saltwater, it won't freeze at that temperature. The counterintuitive / surprising / shocking / impossible (if you don't understand the physics) result is the whole thing drops significantly in temperature, down to around 20 degrees (just above the freezing point of saltwater). Makes no sense, right? Well, some of the engergy from the saltwater is transfered to the ice -- it warms up and thereby melts the ice, but taking the ice (fresh or salt) from solid to liquid takes a lot of energy, so the saltwater, in losing that energy, gradually becomes colder and colder until it gets just above its freezing point (hypothetically 20F). Sounds crazy, but it is real. I have won plenty of bets on my boat when people don't think my RSW bath will be colder than the freshwater ice I feed into it.
     
    stangclassic66 likes this.
  17. hucklongfin

    hucklongfin Deep release specialist

    Location:
    Mission Viejo
    Name:
    MarkT
    Boat:
    Blazer Bay 1860
    • Messages:
      (7,669)
    • Likes Received:
      (4,548)
    Seawater freezes at 28.4F. Lower at the poles since only the water freezes and the freezing point lowers as the salt concentration increases. Per wiki, the lowest saltwater temperature recorded was 27.3F under an Antarctic glacier.
     
  18. yakdout

    yakdout Professional

    Location:
    San Diego
    Name:
    Brandon
    Boat:
    s and hoes
    • Messages:
      (1,152)
    • Likes Received:
      (1,365)
    You should make a bet with the physicist
     
  19. MYNomad

    MYNomad Heading South

    Location:
    Pacific Northwest / West Coast Mexico
    Name:
    Rick
    Boat:
    Yes
    • Messages:
      (3,067)
    • Likes Received:
      (2,443)
    That would be fun. I need to go back read everything above, but I thought I detected a little misinformation. In fact, I will willing to bet a bunch of money if anyone is interested in an education. Who knows, maybe I will be wrong and have to pay out. I am good for it.
     
  20. mullet

    mullet Metal Fabricator

    Location:
    San Fernando Valley
    Name:
    Mike
    Boat:
    19"Gregor
    • Messages:
      (3,526)
    • Likes Received:
      (3,044)
    I always try to make them feel welcome :D
     
    matt86m and carterantebi like this.

Share This Page