Bait Tank Issue

clelandracing

The Masterbaiter
Jul 11, 2010
411
142
Colton, California USA
Name
Shane
Boat
Bayliner 2655 sunbridge, Skipjack 25
ok guys, i could really use some help here. i have tried multiple things over the years and i cant seem to figure it out. after this last trip im done and looking for help. i cant seem to keep bait alive longer than a day. and that is really pushing it. my boat uses a thru hull pickup and the tank is on the back. i get a 20 dollar scoop from nacho and they start floating within a few hours and just keep dying from there. i know its not his bait because the exact same thing happens in San Diego. so here is what i am CURRENTLY running and what i have done in the past. currently i have a 1000gph tsunami aerator pump on the thru hull, 1 1/8 line running to the transom fitting, then 2 hoses going to the tank. i used to have both hoses hooked to my spray bar in the tank and i found the bottom area of the bait tank was a death trap. i have since used one hose to the drain instead and that seems to have helped out some but they still are dying. I started with 600 gph and that couldnt keep up with the tank. switched to 800gph and that was better but still dying. 1000gph seems to last the longest so far. i have put in a bubble maker to try and help and that did more damage than good. maybe too much air? i really envy you guys that can go to catalina and keep bait alive for a weekend. maybe a bigger tank is needed? really hoping to figure this out soon.

160933544_191369942432186_4782313100442000430_n.jpg


161143176_1094879777681285_5772482237588113678_n.jpg


161329802_1179439192529765_639624624344396196_n.jpg


161543040_2962450704044218_474110005590001901_n.jpg
 
Upvote 0

tuna sniffer

SD '63
Jun 16, 2005
647
474
La Mesa
Name
Mark
Boat
1 tin 1 glass
I agree. Get rid of the tank and get an oval kodiak. Also. I’d go 500 on that tank or kodiak 22. 700 on kodaik 32. 1100 is for a 48-65 gal tank.
 
  • Like
Reactions: goatram
Upvote 0

Phat Boat

I Should Upgrade My Account
Apr 18, 2004
2,115
1,095
San Diego
Name
Jon
Boat
Grady White Marlin 300
Looking at the pics, I think the flow is to much even with an 800. The tank looks max 30 gallons? I would use a 500GPH for that tank. 1 inch tubing at most. The pipe on the inside injures the bait, no quick way to remove scales and yes the tank is a 1/2 day tank. When the bait is fighting the current there are problems.
 
  • Like
Reactions: pukahd
Upvote 0

jeffkaiser

Almost A Member
Oct 14, 2005
234
226
escondido, ca
Name
Drew Ann
Boat
Grady White Adventure 208
Yep. Kodiak Pro Flow. Too many obstruction in your tank. You might be able to modify but it would be easier to just get the Kodiak. You shouldn't need an aerator if the flow is right. And that's the end of the day drain at the bottom.
For a Kodiak PF32, the 1000gph may be a bit much. Just adjust with the thru-hull valve to a 5-7 minute fill and you should be good.
BTW West Marine has the same tank under their brand. I think they're all made by Todd. I was told Just get the PF model, not the oblong.
 
  • Like
Reactions: goatram
Upvote 0

ChaseTheBait

Eat em raw
Mar 19, 2019
86
110
36
San Diego
Name
Chase
Boat
Carolina Skiff 1800
I have a 30 gallon short fat oval tank and 700GPH rule pump. Inlet is at the bottom of the tank pointing downward at a 45 degree angle, overflow is at the top of the tank. Inlet valve on the outside of the tank is turned down quite a bit to adjust flow. Half scoop will last as long as I have the pump running. It's a small setup but I love it. It was plug and play. I even installed fittings on the small hatch on the floor near the tank so everything runs under the deck.

I think your main problem is the vertical pipe?
 
Upvote 0

clevel

Skipper
  • Jun 4, 2011
    1,235
    1,049
    Laguna Niguel
    Name
    Cabo Jack
    Boat
    Cobia 261
    Your bait swims in a circular pattern along the wall of the tank. Remove anything in the tank that will cause your bait to collide head on, thus your vertical pipe need to be removed and see if you can find a flush mount drain plate.

    How big is your bait tank? If less than 30 gallons, it will not hold more than a 1/2 scoop. Can you be loading with too much bait? 500 to 800 gph is more likely for a tank from 20 to 30 gallons respectively. Too much flow will also kill the bait.
     
    Upvote 0

    Reel 007

    I Should Upgrade My Account
    Jun 12, 2006
    1,733
    943
    Glendora Ca
    Name
    Leon
    Boat
    28 Wellcraft Coastal "vagabond'
    get rid of that tank and get yourself a tank with baffled fill and drain.
     
    Upvote 0

    MYNomad

    Heading South
    Dec 12, 2007
    4,177
    4,776
    Pacific Northwest / West Coast Mexico
    Name
    Rick
    Boat
    Yes
    Looks to me like you have it hooked up wrong. The fitting at the bottom should be a drain. The fitting 1/3 of the way up from the bottom, which looks like you have blocked off, should be the input.

    But that thing that hangs off of the inside of the tank is going to kill bait. As others have suggested, dump that tank and get a Kodiak.
     
    Upvote 0

    wdlfbio

    Once you go Cat, you never go back
    Sep 15, 2008
    9,793
    9,939
    Olympia, WA
    Name
    laurence
    Boat
    2021 Allied WildCat 30
    Pretty sure you hit nearly every part of it wrong. Hahahaha. You pr big pipe near the top is fine fore your overflow, but you could move it higher to allow more volume in your tank. Even with all other factors corrected, that vertical pipe will strive to kill every bait.
    1) smooth, curved interior so you can get a good circular flow with no head banging.
    2) 500-600 gph is probably plenty. Figure 6-7 minutes to fill your tank. Too much faster and you’re asking bait to run a treadmill to keep up.
    3) end of day drain at the bottom, overfill drain near the top for while in use.

    You might be able to “wall off” the entire height along your vertical input pvc pipe, so when the bait circle the interior, they don’t hit anything. Then, Drill holes along one side to direct flow, so they need to swim in a circular pattern.
     
    • Like
    Reactions: robn
    Upvote 0

    Fishbones

    Your wife thinks about ME
    Nov 7, 2005
    8,485
    703
    58
    Chula Vista
    Name
    Rich
    Boat
    One Off 28' Custom Built Skipjack (SOUTHWESTERN) & 18' Sylvan (Short Runs)
    Get yourself a good tank, I run a 850 pump on a 65 gallon tank and let bait go at the end of the day
     
    Upvote 0

    Dragon

    It is what it is...
    May 24, 2006
    423
    298
    SLO Co.
    Name
    Paul
    Boat
    22' Pro Sport CC / 20' Skipjack Open
    Get rid of those Y 's too. Extra fittings (90's) suck too...the inside dia. of the valves on the Y's are no were near pipe size. Fewest fittings possible, and buy the correct valves w/flow. Then just have a valve (1) to adj. tank flow from the pump...Read: Less Fittings, More Hose & Good Valves....
     
    • Like
    Reactions: clelandracing
    Upvote 0

    Fishbones

    Your wife thinks about ME
    Nov 7, 2005
    8,485
    703
    58
    Chula Vista
    Name
    Rich
    Boat
    One Off 28' Custom Built Skipjack (SOUTHWESTERN) & 18' Sylvan (Short Runs)
    I would look into an Offshore 45 tank, plastic tanks sitting in the sun is not good for them
     

    tuna sniffer

    SD '63
    Jun 16, 2005
    647
    474
    La Mesa
    Name
    Mark
    Boat
    1 tin 1 glass
    I would look into an Offshore 45 tank, plastic tanks sitting in the sun is not good for them
    Cover the tank or the boat and the tank will be good for the life of the boat. Kodiak tanks are very weather resistant and cost less than half of a fg tank. That said, I just bought a Bluewater 48. Very nice if you have the space to run the hoses below deck.
     

    sickcat

    Silverback
    Aug 5, 2003
    3,741
    1,779
    64
    LA
    Name
    Kerry
    Boat
    Yellow spot
    I would look into an Offshore 45 tank, plastic tanks sitting in the sun is not good for them
    Any quality plastic tank (Kodiak, Todd, Pacific Edge etc) has additives in the plastic to make it stand up to sun/UV for a long time. I have a Kodiak that is close to 20 years old and is fine. On the other hand the fittings most companies use do not stand up to the sun nearly as well as the tank itself. I just replaced them on that 20 year old Kodiak.

    As for the OPs problems that tank looks to be a pretty small width and depth in proportion to the height. That makes those obstructions in the tank all the worse.
     

    sickcat

    Silverback
    Aug 5, 2003
    3,741
    1,779
    64
    LA
    Name
    Kerry
    Boat
    Yellow spot
    Get rid of those Y 's too. Extra fittings (90's) suck too...the inside dia. of the valves on the Y's are no were near pipe size. Fewest fittings possible, and buy the correct valves w/flow. Then just have a valve (1) to adj. tank flow from the pump...Read: Less Fittings, More Hose & Good Valves....
    Totally agree about excess fittings/restrictions in the plumbing. One thing that can help is to use oversized hose/ fittings especially when space available dictates adding additional fittings to make things fit.

    I usually upsize hose & fittings one size even when I have minimum fittings the idea being to maximize volume and minimize velocity.
     

    mahi

    Member
    Jan 5, 2005
    855
    204
    laguna niguel
    Name
    Bob
    Boat
    Henriques 28 Express
    Is that a bungee cord holding it in place? After you buy a new tank, make sure it is securely mounted. BTW. Bait takes a lot of abuse when the tank is mounted so far aft. Swim steps may look like a great place for a bait tank, but not really. Move it to the deck if you can.
     

    pukahd

    I’m getting nibbles
    Oct 30, 2004
    918
    880
    Torrance
    Name
    Brian
    Boat
    Cabo 216
    I have a Pacific Edge tank 35 g or so and hardly ever have much dead bait. In my other boat I had a Kodak 32 gal tank with a 800gph pump and again, very little dead.
     
    Upvote 0

    alex88

    Member
    May 15, 2006
    915
    188
    41
    Oakland
    Name
    Alex
    Boat
    2003 Robalo R235
    Whatever size tank you get, the fill time should be 7-8 minutes from start to going out the over flow. This is the magic zone to flush impurities and not causing the bait to work itself to death.

    I have a 48 Bluewater with an 800gph pump and still had to neck flow down with a valve between pump and tank.

    the Kodiak is the best hands down plastic tank before to move to the big time with a glass tank. I rocked a 22 Kodiak for years on my smaller boat and they kick ass for the price point.
     
    • Like
    Reactions: Ryan_J
    Upvote 0
    Sep 25, 2010
    12
    2
    Sugarland, TX
    Name
    Jack Muton
    Hey deland…, don’t feel bad, baitfish dying during transport this is an ancient fisherman’s problem.

    Just an opinion:

    Many offshore summer fishermen do have serious problems keeping live bait alive and healthy especially at night. Acquiring live bait fish for several days offshore trip is time consuming and expensive and disappointing every time it dies or gets sickly prematurely for some odd reason. Most fishermen just put up with the high mortality and sloppy, sickly baits You know, If the gills still move a little, that quality bait is better than dead bait. Hook up the liveliest baits first so to speak.

    A livewell is no more than a box that holds water and used to transport live baits. Water quality inside your box is what’s really important regardless of how much your brand box cost, the size or water volume of all your water pumps you use to flush thousands of gallons of sea water through your box. If your livewell will not keep baits alive and healthy during transport, you got yourself a real death-well. That the grey area where you are is between a functional livewell and a non-functional death well.

    A prominent fish physiologist told me years ago that 99.9% of the live bait mortality (daytime and nighttime) is caused by poor, unsafe water quality inside the box containing the bait fish and always has been the cause of summer bait problems. I believe him.

    He advised me to learn how to fix my bad livewell water quality and the high mortality and sloppy bait problems will be dramatically decline. Search – “dying bait fish,poor livewell water quality” Actually, this is the best advice I ever had about transporting live bait fish.

    When and if you will take the time to learn how to safely manage your livewell water quality in the summer, any offshore bait fish are as easy to keep alive and healthy as goldfish in a goldfish bowl sitting in a kids room.

    Water quality does not discriminate between fish species, it’s either safe or it’s not safe. Safe water quality must be maintained continuously from the time the baits are placed in the well to the last bait you wish with hours and days.

    Just an opinion that works 27/7 – 7 days a week every summer. I fish with live bait of the highest quality and keep them healthy for days. It’s all about managing livewell water quality and stocking density.
     
    Upvote 0