Assist Hook Knot

fakeruben

Newbie
Apr 17, 2017
65
22
35
San Diego
Name
Ruben
Boat
Malibu X-Factor
Wanted to get outside perspectives on the assist hook knot I came up with.

I followed the directions here: http://www.fishtrack.com/how-to/make-your-own-assist-hooks_100147

And then I added my own twist. I threaded the kevlar line into itself using splicing needles for a cleaner appearance and less chance of fouling. The ends of the kevlar have been sealed with TacGlue to prevent fraying. The knot from the link above is done with the portion containing the two tag ends, which come together after entering the eye of the hook (second photo). I did this to keep the knot from becoming too bulky from the doubled portion and potentially introducing slippage from three different sized lines.

I pulled heatshrink tubing over one example, with great effort. The tubing didn't shrink flush to the hook or the doubled portion after applying heat, so I don't think moving to large diameter would be any better, and I'm wondering if it would even be necessary. (Edit Fourth Photo)

The loop can still be enlarged by pulling back the outer line, making it super easy to secure through a ring. (Third photo)

Thoughts?

IMG_8717.jpg


IMG_8718.jpg


IMG_8721.jpg


IMG_8723.jpg
 
Last edited:

tunadoctor

Newbie
Sep 10, 2008
69
9
Orange
Name
Francis Wong
Boat
21 ft. Bay Champion
I’m wondering if using a circle hook is more beneficial than using a J hook. Circle hooks are made to hook the fish in the corner of the mouth and usually means not “setting” the hook when the fish bites. That would mean that when the fish (bft?) swallow the jig, you’re allowing the jig to slide back out so that one of the assist hooks grabs the fish’s corner of the mouth. It’s much easier to accomplish when using live bait. But I have never seen a circle hook used on any artificial lure out in the market. I would imagine that there would be a lot of missed fish using a circle hook on an assist hook. Just my humble opinion.
 
  • Like
Reactions: fakeruben
Upvote 0

fakeruben

Newbie
Apr 17, 2017
65
22
35
San Diego
Name
Ruben
Boat
Malibu X-Factor
I’m wondering if using a circle hook is more beneficial than using a J hook. Circle hooks are made to hook the fish in the corner of the mouth and usually means not “setting” the hook when the fish bites. That would mean that when the fish (bft?) swallow the jig, you’re allowing the jig to slide back out so that one of the assist hooks grabs the fish’s corner of the mouth. It’s much easier to accomplish when using live bait. But I have never seen a circle hook used on any artificial lure out in the market. I would imagine that there would be a lot of missed fish using a circle hook on an assist hook. Just my humble opinion.

Ah, the circle hooks were just the nearest hooks I hand handy to practice the knot/rigging on, they weren't meant to be the actual production model.
 
Upvote 0

aguachico

I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
Jul 20, 2004
6,805
2,175
El Lago Tijuana
Name
Art
Boat
Trident Yak- Grady White Seafarer
Nice mod.

I have tied a bunch of kevlar splice assist hooks. Best thing is any hook can be used. You can modify any hook to your spec and confident it will hold.

Kevlar is the shit.

I have found the the first knot does the holding and the second knot is very bulky, hence OEM assist hooks generally have one knot, I have tied both. I like the one knot on smaller hooks.

Which tag end is doing the knot?

One tip: After I secure the knot and tag with tact glue and let it cure - I dip the entire assist hook into water, then a put a small piece of shrink wrap on the tag and a larger shrink wrap on the knot. The water helps protect the kevlar when applying heat.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dsl
Upvote 0

fakeruben

Newbie
Apr 17, 2017
65
22
35
San Diego
Name
Ruben
Boat
Malibu X-Factor
Which tag end is doing the knot?

One tip: After I secure the knot and tag with tact glue and let it cure - I dip the entire assist hook into water, then a put a small piece of shrink wrap on the tag and a larger shrink wrap on the knot. The water helps protect the kevlar when applying heat.

Both. They're doubled just like in the linked example. They join together after the knot, as it reenters the eye of the hook.

I wasn't sure about adding the TacGlue to the rest of the knot, but I did think about. I noticed there was some sort of chemical burn occurring, that's what keeps the ends from fraying. I was concerned it might weaken the knot.
 
Upvote 0

aguachico

I Post A Lot But I Can't Edit This
Jul 20, 2004
6,805
2,175
El Lago Tijuana
Name
Art
Boat
Trident Yak- Grady White Seafarer
Both. They're doubled just like in the linked example. They join together after the knot, as it reenters the eye of the hook.

I wasn't sure about adding the TacGlue to the rest of the knot, but I did think about. I noticed there was some sort of chemical burn occurring, that's what keeps the ends from fraying. I was concerned it might weaken the knot.
Ok, understood.

I set my knots using a 35# dumbbell. I bounce it a couple of times. Afterwards I add the tacglue. Best part the components are cheap and easy to use.

tight lines
 
Upvote 0

fakeruben

Newbie
Apr 17, 2017
65
22
35
San Diego
Name
Ruben
Boat
Malibu X-Factor
what brand of kevlar line, what pound test/dia, where do u buy it, amazon? Thanks

This one right here: amazon.com/gp/product/B01AZBIOR4

The examples I posted were with 500lbs. I could not get the 300lbs to splice, too narrow. I couldn't pull the tag end through with either latches or loops.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aguachico
Upvote 0