Anchoring a closed bow boat

Wild Bill

Forgettable member
Aug 4, 2010
3,499
3,537
Camano Island
Name
Steve
Boat
Otter Craft
Are we talking for halibut or for mooring?
 

Wild Bill

Forgettable member
Aug 4, 2010
3,499
3,537
Camano Island
Name
Steve
Boat
Otter Craft

Wild Bill

Forgettable member
Aug 4, 2010
3,499
3,537
Camano Island
Name
Steve
Boat
Otter Craft
With the upcoming season and the amount of boats anchoring these days I will remind people to use good judgement and give a guy some room. Don't come along and lowhole a guy who has gotten there before you. Remember some of us have 600' of rode or more so account for this when anchoring up stream. I personally will not anchor within about 1/4 of a mile from another boat. I also will not anchor anywhere near some of the clots of boats you see nowadays on some of the banks. There is a lot of structure in the straits that hold Hali so no reason to be a sheep. Besides with all that gear and scent down there you are just lowering your odds a hali will bite your gear if you fish amongst the masses. Have fun and be safe all.
 
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Tower Todd

Number #2
May 2, 2006
6,065
636
Touring the Pacific Ocean at 12 knots
Name
Todd S.
Boat
274' Long Range
The drawing posted in the link is very close to what the tuna fishermen use in the NE with one major exception.

In the drawing it shows releasing the line from the aft corner cleat and the anchor will slip free in the event you have to get off the anchor in a hurry. The downside is you will then have a line dragging in the water. In this setup, you would have the ring on the end of your anchor line and would need to use all of your anchor line each time (to get to the end of the line and the ring).

The tuna fishermen use a similar system, but rather than having the anchor line ring slide off the bowline they tie the end of the bowline into their anchor line using a rolling hitch (you tube this knot if you need to learn how to tie it). Once you have the rolling hitch made up, you'll pay out a bit more anchor line until the bow line takes the load. To release pull up the anchor line just far enough to release the bow line. The advantage is that you can anchor at any depth ( not just where your ring is located), you won't have a line dragging in the water and you never have to leave the cockpit to anchor, or re-anchor.

With this system, you would have a tub or garbage can with all of your anchor line in the cockpit with you. On the bitter end of the anchor line you would have a float. In case you have to get off the anchor, you would be able to undo the rolling hitch, dump the remaining line and float and be free.

Hope this helps, and hope it made sense.

TT
 

Wild Bill

Forgettable member
Aug 4, 2010
3,499
3,537
Camano Island
Name
Steve
Boat
Otter Craft
I have a chunk of floating yellow poly roughly twice the length of my boat that attaches to rear cleat and is fed forward through my last bow rail stanchion and then back to cockpit and it has a carabiner attached to it. When I anchor I have a tub with the rode and anchor in the cockpit, and simply toss anchor out and rode pays out of tub. At the end of the rode I have a ss ring about 6" in diameter attached to which I attach the carabiner at the end of the poly rope. Just before I let it all go I clip on scottsman buoy forward of the 6" ring on the rode. If I need to get free in an emergency it is as simple as taking spliced loop on end of poly rope off the rear cleat. The rope then snakes forward and free of boat and you have no rope attached to boat in the water. When I go to pull anchor all I do is fire up and run upstream and rode slides through large carabiner attached to scottsman buoy until it hangs anchor below. I then coil now limp rode back into tub. It is really much simpler than it sounds and works very well and prevents ever having to leave the cockpit. Definitely several different ways to accomplish the same thing. Most of the Canadians use the bow painter tied to the rear cleat method as Todd described. One last note, if you anchor enough you will eventually stick an anchor. To help the chances of getting it back I use a claw type anchor and attach chain to forward hole above flukes. I then run chain along shank and attach chain to the hole on the end of the shank with a couple heavy panduit ties. This arrangement allows ties to break and pull anchor free in most instances.
 
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Waterdog~

Just one more
Sep 1, 2009
2,762
2,104
Hollywood
Name
Brian
Boat
Tiderunner
There is a lot of structure in the straits that hold Hali so no reason to be a sheep. Besides with all that gear and scent down there you are just lowering your odds a hali will bite your gear if you fish amongst the masses. Have fun and be safe all.
But I love crowds.......:frehya2:
 

fishbadger

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Apr 6, 2012
252
208
WA
Name
fishbadger
Boat
.Grady Gulfstream 232 "Herd of Turtles"
This is basically what I do. Makes it a piece of cake, although I can always seem to screw it up on some occasions!


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OceanSun

Captain
Mar 26, 2013
141
127
Snohomish WA
Name
Dan Meyer
Boat
Ocean Dancer 21' Trophy
Some people can't drink beer and drift at the same time - they need to be on anchor.

I get how successful anchoring can be with setting up a scent trail, etc. but I've never had the need to got to that much trouble. I know it's much more popular in the eastern straits and MA 9. Also seems to be used more frequently in BC for some reason.