All Swivels ARE NOT Created Equal... or are they?

Dexter Outdoors

Reverendpdp

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I'd like to get your thoughts or using the many different types of swivels out there? Crane, ball-bearing, etc. Which do you use for wire or heavy leaders? Are the ball bearings necessary with some jigs and irons, or will regular cranes suffice? How about size / weight? I don't see the point of using a swivel rated for 200# if the wire leader is only rated for 50#. Am I missing something?
 
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okie man

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If you're talking about swivels for wahoo bombs, jigs and such I really like spro power swivels in 80 and 120 pound sizes. Very small, stealthy for strength! I use them for up to 60# mono/floro
 
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Outhouse

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Ditto on the Spro swivels. These things are small, so go higher on the pound test than you might think, as the wire tends to be very small. I use the 230# swivels. I just got off the Excel and had numerous hookups on my wire leaders without a failure.
 
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screamingreel

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Material is more important with swivels than style or brand. They may look the same, but stainless steel swivels are much stronger for their size than brass swivels. Both can be nickle-plated. Black swivels are usually coated with copper and oxidized to make them black.

For long range, I look at size of swivel not strength rating to determine which one to use. Difficult to do when buying on the internet! Most swivels I use are ball-bearing at least triple the actual breaking strength of either line connected to it.

- Jeff Burroughs
 
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Brad I

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Most swivels I use are ball-bearing at least triple the actual breaking strength of either line connected to it.

- Jeff Burroughs

Interesting. I've been using the same rule of thumb under the theory that drag is set at up to 1/3 of the rated line strength to allow for shock absorption, so I just adopted the same 3:1 ratio for shock absorption for a swivel. Nice to hear that someone else is doing that too.

For big game fishing, I use good swivels. For rockfishing, I'm not so picky--no freight training or blistering runs to worry about.
 
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canyonman

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No not all swivels are the same. Learned that the hard way on some bigger models. I couldn't figure it out, but after speaking with a long ranger who advise I trust. I was enlightened.
 
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Reverendpdp

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Never really understood that 3:1 rule. If your line or leader is 100#, why not get a swivel rated at 120-130#? What is the reasoning behind using a swivel rated for 300#? The only thing I could see is that the wire rings used on the swivels can be so small and thin that they can cut your connection...
 
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fishordie

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The rated strength of these swivels is all fine and good but at the end of the day I do not worry about stealth as much as I worry about too thin a wire gauge of the swivel cutting into my mono or flouro. For those who might be using a crimp and protective sleeve connection to replace knots, too thin a wire on the swivel will penetrate the coiled wire protectors causing a separation of the coils and potentially result in reducing the breaking strength of the plastic line. The solid plastic type protectors tend to be great in most of these situations.

Speaking only for me I see no reason to use a swivel on my wire Wahoo bait leaders. I use a # 4 owner or similar solid ring with both ends Haywire twisted to the hook and ring using solid wire or I use a triple insert crimp for 7 strand. Unlike most folks I do use, on occasion, a coated 7 strand as I like the suppleness of the thing when the bite is more wide open and often it can be re-used. Unlike most folks, I do not use a bare 7 strand as I do not like all the hair like strands I have to deal with both during the crimping operation, on the table or protective surface and any that might find their way onto my actual wired leader. No poking of the fingers for this angler.

Again, My reason for using a higher than needed rated swivel for items such as chunk rigs (I am not much of a chunker) and more importantly artificial lure type work only is due to making sure the wire gauge of the swivel does not cut my plastic line connection. I go with Ball bearing type swivels choosing as small a product as I feel is appropriate for the pound test line diameter using the parameters noted above.

Jamie
 
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pmurphy

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I can't remember the brand, but I had the split ring on a ball bearing swivel completely straighten out while I was testing the knot. The swivel was rated at 150% of the line strength.

I am now in the you-get-what-you-pay-for camp.
 
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stephen campbell

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Has anyone has experience with the Spro "aussie" style heavy duty swivels? Relatively small for # test with large holes to spread line load.
 
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RichG

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Since we are discussing swivels, I am use to the traditional swivel (fist pic) and have not tried the more cylinder type (2nd pic). Can some one chime in and set me straight as to are they that much better. By their design with case less resistance and noise in the water.
10114226.jpg
images.jpg
 
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JohnTFT

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Has anyone has experience with the Spro "aussie" style heavy duty swivels? Relatively small for # test with large holes to spread line load.

We used the Aussie swivels for years on Giant Bluefin.

The issue with them is while the attachment holes are large the edges are sharp. Chafe gear is an absolute when using them.

The Power Swivel is a great product. You can use it with confidence super small and very strong.

AFW has the mighty swivels - stainless steel and really strong.

Owner has the Hyper swivels which are super strong as well.

If you are a chunker (I chunk a great deal) use a ball bearing swivel. The less resistance to turn the swivel leads to less line memory when fishing with leaders.
 
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RichG

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We used the Aussie swivels for years on Giant Bluefin.

The issue with them is while the attachment holes are large the edges are sharp. Chafe gear is an absolute when using them.

So John, are you saying with the Aussie swivels, all attachments need to be crimped with an anit-chafing guard on the mono/fluro?
 
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calicobassguy

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I realize that most of this thread is appropriately responding to the original swivel preference questions in terms of big game fishing. Keep in mind when targeting small species, too much "weight rated" swivel is problematic. In some situations, the whole purpose of using a swivel is to prevent any leader line twist from occurring. The leader will continue to twist if it can't easily and freely "start" and "continue to spin" the swivel.
 
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scubaarchery

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I have traditionally used spro power swivels for fish up to 100 lbs. once I go over 100 then switch to ball bearing. For my upcoming OBX trip I plan to use jigstar grommet swivels for my jigs and heavy ball bearing swivels for my poppers and swimbaits. I use swivels that are equal too or heavier than my line strength and the size of the fish I hope to catch.
 
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JohnTFT

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We used the Aussie swivels for years on Giant Bluefin.

The issue with them is while the attachment holes are large the edges are sharp. Chafe gear is an absolute when using them.

So John, are you saying with the Aussie swivels, all attachments need to be crimped with an anit-chafing guard on the mono/fluro?


Yes - or you have to braze rings on them as fishy as said.
 
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