28 Foot Force Project

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Thanks Bill, I appreciate you chiming in. It's good to hear you've had good success with arrangements like this. How do you guys radius the actual EDGE of the tunnel entrance (where you cut the hole)? I was thinking of just using an air file or a grinder and doing my best. I don't want there to be a sharp edge right where the new tunnel glass meets the old hull glass.
 

Big Bad Bill

Well-Known "Member"
Mar 30, 2011
99
185
Santa Barbara Channel
Name
Big Bad Bill
Boat
Bijoux Del Mar
we have a ski (flat) on the bottom and try to make the entrance as gentle as possible. You want the water to flow smoothly, no turbulence or cavitation. A grinder then air file is probably the best. we usually have the front or entrance of the tunnel a bit longer than you. On the new builds we put a tunnel plug in the hull mold. It's easier and stronger. Yours looks good especially with the straight area where the prop is. Makes for better direction of the prop thrust, and then more efficient water flow. The boat in my little picture was a 26' powered by a Yanmar 6LP 315 hp. It cruised at 22 knots, top speed 29 knots and burned 6 gal/hour at cruising speed. It is he best riding 26 I've ever built. I've built 75 of the 26' and powered them all different ways.
V drive tunnel is the way to go. Keep us posted on the build
 
Last edited:

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Thanks Bill. I can't tell you how good it is to hear that from someone with your experience.
 
Last edited:

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Got the outer stringers glassed in pretty good with 3 units of 1.5 oz roving and 18 oz mat. These don't need to be nearly as strong as the main stringers since they don't hold the engine. I still need to tab them into the forward fuel tanks and the transom.



Since I grinded out so much of the hull, I am going to run a few layers of glass from the stringers outwards to about the height of the deck just to strengthen everything up a little more and I'll be doing some more coats on the stringers themselves too that will overlap the tunnel sheets once I get the tunnel glassed in. Trying to make everything be overlapped by everything else around it, multiple times.

I finished tabbing the transom in the other day. I was told on boatdesign.com that a boat my size would have a minimum of 3 units of tabbing for the transom. A boat with twin 300HP outboards would require 6 layers of tabbing. I decided to overbuild the transom so I did 6 layers of staggered Nytex all around (except for where the tunnel is). This transom should be plenty strong, especially since there won't be any outboards hanging on it.






Before the layup got too hot, I went over all the Nytex and roving with a few layers of 1.5oz mat and I was able to fair it out pretty good by doing this. It doesn't look smooth in the pics because of the black Sharpie ink dissolved in the resin, but It's actually pretty smooth to the touch and will look nice once sanded and gelcoated. Not planning on doing any putty of major fairing on the inside. It will have a slightly rough look. I might do a light black webbing under the gunnels to match the cab interior but not worried about that kind of thing right now...



Still trying to get a lot of work done before I glass the tunnel in place since it's so easy to climb in and out of the hole in the bottom of the boat for now. I am getting to a point where I am going to have to glass the tunnel in soon though, that way I can overlap the tunnel glass with some of the other glass I am adding to the boat. I don't want it too heavy, but I'd rather have it a little too heavy than have something break.
 

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Today we did the first round of tabbing to tie the engine stringers into the existing stringers and the forward bulkhead:



This was a huge layup and we used over a gallon of resin over 2 hours. This is a really critical part of the "backbone" of the boat so I want it to be strong. We kept laying glass until it got too hot to lay more without it hardending before we could get the bubbles out. We stopped as soon as we got a bubble we couldn't get out so I'll grind that out later. Got about half the tabbing done. This was a good first round.

Started off by laying 4 layers of 1-inch 1.5 oz mat strips in all the corners to "round" them off more sort of like a fillet. Then used Nytex for most of the tabs. Started with the smaller pieces and staggered the ends so that way they all overlap each other, getting larger and larger and larger...etc... But staggering them so that there are no high ridges. Did 2 units of 1.5oz mat and 18oz roving over the bulkhead too to tie it all together.

I think I will add some more glass to the other side of the stringer too. There is a drain hole over there that I will have to re drill. There will be more layers of roving/mat/roving/mat to go over the stringers later once the tunnel is glassed in some. These will overlap the tunnel layers. Trying to have as many overlaps as possible and do big glass sessions to get good chemical bonds.

I want these stringers to be extremely strong just in case I ever decide to plug in a nice 370HP 6BTA one day instead of the 210 I have. Not afraid to add some thickness in this part of the boat.....
 

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
In the meantime, the glass I laid on the transom and stringers last week had cured enough to grind. Today, I chugged some strong coffee and put in a 10 hour grinding session on the inner transom, hull, stringers, fuel tanks and under the gunnels. Looks a lot cleaner and flatter now. I cleaned everything down to bare fiberglass, I leveled out uneven spots and I ground out any bubbles larger than 1/4" using a 24 grit 5" disc on my 4" makita grinder. Ear plugs, tyvek suit, respirator, goggles, hat, long sleeve shirt, jeans.... the whole 9 yards. I don't even feel itchy being done today but maybe I am slightly used to it.







The dust was several inches deep at times but the tarps over the boat and wet vac with a pool hose worked good at keeping the dust confined to the inside of the boat and vacuum. I only had to bang the vacuum filter out twice all day.

I did find a couple spots I missed after it was all cleaned up but I will hit those with some sand paper tomorrow before a final cleaning with acetone and compressed air.

Tomorrow, I am going to try to get the underside of the gunnels all sealed up and glassed in. I'm gonna put extra fiberglass reinforcement where the cleats will go on the top of the transom.

 

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Got most of the glassing done on the bottom of the gunnels. I underestimated how much work it would be. These should have been pre-glassed on the backsides before the plywood was put in place, but there is also good value in getting things done in a short amount of time. The front side has a few layers of Nytex layered over the top and all the gunnels are plenty strong. You can kick them as hard as you want and they won't break. Strong enough. My main concern for covering the undersides with glass was mostly for water sealing purposes. I could have slapped some resin on the bottom sides and called it good, but I figured I would put a few layers on the bottom sides for good measure.

I was originally going to cut the pieces each to perfect sizes and cover the flat areas with overlaps onto the other flat areas, but it ended up being too difficult to wet the bigger pieces up first and stick them upside down under the gunnel. I ended up cutting about 150 or so 6x7 inch squares of 1.5oz mat, which were the dimensions of most of the areas.







This glass would have been near impossible for me to put in there with the deck in place. It is not so much the difficulty of working upside down.... it is more about the angle you have to be to see what you are doing and at the same time not have resin drip on your face and make you go blind.











I generously overlapped the squares as I put them on, beefing up the corners. Less glass on the front flat areas but at least one layer all around. I put a lot of extra pieces on the areas where I am going to install rod holders and I really beefed up the areas where the rear cleats will go. I connected these to the transom because I want these plenty strong just in case I ever have to tow someone in or maybe even tie the boat to the trailer? I will probably put some more roving/mat under where these cleats will go to really tie them in.

I ended up getting the gunnels about 90% sealed up and reinforced, which is where I want to be before it becomes near impossible to do with the deck in..I still have to finish the bottom edge and do some minor glassing, but that can all be done after the deck goes in and I don't have any obstructions in the way. So far, the bottom side of these gunnels has has taken well over 10 hours of glassing over a couple days. If they were pre-glassed it probably would have taken an extra 30 minutes to do that.... I am having to be really careful with the resin not to get it on my face, but glad the job is about done because it really sucked.
 

Kinaiahi61

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jan 17, 2012
519
206
Lihue, Hi
Name
Kalani
Boat
Kai Kea
Beautiful! You're putting in a lot of work, and it's gonna last. If you don't have a full face mask respirator, I can't suggest it enough. Never had one prior to this build, but bought one and wish I would have did it years ago. You don't have to worry about your eyes or inhalation. Put the P 100 filters on when you grind, and put the organic vapor cartridges when you're glassing and you're good. Good luck it looks great, Aloha.
 

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Another week of glass work here and there. I finished glassing the bottom sides of the gunnels. I spent a day fairing the tunnel mold that way it will release easy once I glass it in. A few skim coats of Z-Grip and some hours on the straight line sander and the mold is looking good. I got it down to 220 grit and only found a few small pits in the mold. I will probably do a couple more skim coats of putty to make it "perfect" and eventually sand it down to 1000 grit or so before I start the buffing procedure that the mold release wax calls for.

This week I did one big grind job around where the tunnel is going to be glassed in. I wanted to make sure I am attaching the tunnel to clean fiberglass and I also wanted to radius the edge of the hull slightly that way I am not asking the fiberglass to make too much of a sharp turn where it meets the hull.



With most of the prepping done, tonight, I decided to do what will probably be the last "dry fit" for the tunnel mold on the hull before I glass it on the boat. Leveled side to side with the boat. Fore and aft, the roof of the tunnels is parallel with the floating waterline of the boat (assuming the floating waterline is 2-degrees bow up).






Even with the mat and putty I added to the mold, I think it's a pretty good fit. It touches in the front, middle, and back and nowhere is the gap more than about 1/4".





I think I am going to put a very small fillet with some peanut butter just to fill the gap before I lay any mat down. Hopefully, this works with the PVA and doesn't damage the PVA coats when I try to make a fillet on top of it.... I think I'll be fine if I just do it gently. We'll see...

The fillet will give a nice smooth surface for the new glass to lay, while at the same time help stop the resin from leaking down onto the mold bottom platform of the mold, making it difficult to release the mold when it dries. The plan right now to stop this from happening is to just use a bunch of blue painter's tape to cover any gaps from the bottom side. That's the plan anyway.

Can't wait to get the tunnel glassed in so I can get the rudder and tranny lined up. Looking forward to some non glass work, however little of it there is to come in the distant future.
 

Kinaiahi61

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jan 17, 2012
519
206
Lihue, Hi
Name
Kalani
Boat
Kai Kea
Very nice!!! A lot of man hours for sure. Keep plugging away, it looks great.
 

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Focused on the tunnel for the last 2 weeks in a row. 99% of all the work on the tunnel has been prep and planning so far. I originally thought it would be too hard to accurately put flat spots on the tunnel mold for the rudder and strut BEFORE I glassed the tunnel in in place (and still have it accurately level forward, side to side and lined to center once everything goes in).



The black line on the mold in this picture represents where the mold meets the hull. The tunnel mold roof is parallel to the (estimated) floating waterline of the boat so the rear of the flat part of the tunnel roof is elevated 1.7 degrees. I have the rudder so it sticks out past the transom about 5 inches. The prop will be placed on the shaft as close to the rudder as possible but still enabling me to take the prop off without taking the rudder off. The strut will have a good swing back to it but I am told a custom strut is doable based on these pics and I could possibly move the prop forward a little in the long run making the strut even shorter. I will be able to play with the distance between the prop and the rudder once I get some more glass layers on the tunnel. For now, I am just trying to get the rudder in and everything else should fall into place. These pics are basically how I decided on the location of the flat spots for the rudder and strut





The 22-inch prop is probably slightly bigger than I am going to need.. I will be slightly over propped, but this thing isn't going to be a hot rod or anything and I'd like to save fuel in the long tun. In the prop calculator we used 10,000 lbs for a boat weight. I am thinking 7,000-8,000 lbs on a normal basis. The tunnel is designed for a 22-inch prop and if we have to move down eventually to a 20 inch or so prop in the future, then so be it. Having a 20 inch prop will mean a smoother flow of water into the prop since the tunnel was designed for a 22-inch prop so it won't hurt to move down a little. I'd rather start off over propped slightly and work down, rather than having too small of a tunnel later on.





I decided that since the mold lined up so good to the hull previously, all I had to do is level the mold (perfectly with my digital level) and attach the flat spots to the mold based on the info I got from lining up the rudder/prop/etc.

I got a sheet of window glass from home depot and cut out a 6x6" piece for a place for the rudder port and a 12x8" piece for a place for the strut. I attached the glass pieces the mold with a hot batch of z-grip filler and held it at 90.00 with the digital level until it hardened. (I lined everything up center on the tunnel mold with some 80lb fishing line.)





I used window glass because it's cheap, flat, won't bend, it's thin and very smooth to allow a good release for the mold. If it doesn't release with the mold I can break it out. But it will because I'm coating it all with PVA.

Since this is a one off mold I got some oil-based clay called Van Aken Plastalina from hobby lobby and I added in a radius/angled sides to connect the edges of the glass to the hull. This clay stays soft so you have to be gentle with it. I spent 2 solid hours working with the clay and figured that was enough. I think it came out pretty good.





That gives a better taper for the glass to come off the flat spots and onto the tunnel mold.

After that, I coated the whole thing with 3 coats of PVA and let it all dry. Once dry, I lined the mold up under the boat (yet again). I've probably pulled is big ass bulky mold out and under the boat like 8 times now. It was good to be doing it for the last time. I guess I got lucky and it all lined up perfectly. 90.00 degrees for both the tunnel mold and the flat spots for the rudder and strut I ended up installing (according to my digital level).

I mixed up 400ML of vinyl ester thickened with 70% q-cell 30% cabosil. This was put into a gallon ziploc bag and we cut the corner offf making a bag sort of like a cake maker uses. Squeezed the resin into the crack between the hull and mold. This was smoothed out with the radius on a spreader and we proceeded to layup 1 layer of 1.5oz mat overtop of the mold and the hull. We are starting with the largest piece of mat first, which climb the stringers 3 inches.



This first layer was just a "skin coat" over the mold. I think in the next session we will radius some of the corners more and probably attempt to do 1-layer of mat and 1 layer of roving. For now we were just happy to have one layer down good with NO BUBBLES.



The white blotches are not bubbles. That's where Sean D got wild with the roller on my peanut butter fillet. It is actually not very much peanut butter really, but enough to add some color to those parts. Afterwards, I could not find a single bubble in the hole layup.







I had to cut slits in various spots along the fabric to get it to conform. These slits will have to be staggered throughout the whole tunnel building process and overlapped with more fabric in those areas. More fabric will be added to where the strut and rudder go of course. 1/2" thick was recommended for the total tunnel thickeness. I am going to go more for good measure. Not afraid to add some weight in this part of the boat. Going to be building most of the tunnel with 18oz roving and 1.5oz mat. Possibly some nytex on the transom and possibly the flat spots where the rudder/strut go I'm glad to have this one layer of glass on and have all the complicated stuff out of the way now... Good to have it all aligned "perfectly" too. Can't wait to get some more layers on so I can pull the mold out and see the final shape. Maybe after another glass session or two I can do that. Now just have to wait til it dries so I can sand and keep going.

I'm going to keep tucking glass UNDER the transom until I can't lay any more, then the remaining crack will be filled with peanut butter and covered with glass.

 
Last edited:

Kinaiahi61

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jan 17, 2012
519
206
Lihue, Hi
Name
Kalani
Boat
Kai Kea
Great work Maka, I look forward to your progress. I would add some milled fibers and csm fibers to the radius on the hull to transom if you weren't going to. It'll make it crazy strong. Good luck!
 

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Good call. I am going to be filling arch-shaped crack between the tunnel and transom with 70% q-cell hollow microspheres and about 30% cabosil for a final thickening so I will try to make a nice radiused fillet when I do that.

I also plan on covering ALL the inner 90-degree angles with 1-inch strips of mat/csm. (like 5 or 6 layers of mat). Adding a lot of 1-inch strips to all the inner corners is a good way to add bulk and increase the radius. Even stronger than peanut butter. I cut like 500 feet of 1-inch wide 1.5oz mat strips with a deer skinning knife so I'm going to lay bunch of strips on the stringers, tunnel, bulkheads, etc to radius them more.
 
Last edited:

Kinaiahi61

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jan 17, 2012
519
206
Lihue, Hi
Name
Kalani
Boat
Kai Kea
Cool, that's a lot of work!!! How's the deer knife work? Does it fray it or is it a clean cut? Never thought of using my game knife for that, good idea.
 

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Works great if you do it on a piece of plywood. Trick is you have to hold the knife low against the surface and go WITH the grain in the wood and it gives you a nice clean cut. Hasn't seemed to dull the knife at all and I've been using it off and on for a few years now. In fact I think it's gotten sharper.

 

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
I let the first layer cure for 7 days. Still slightly tacky enough to clog the sand paper. I've found the VE resin takes longer to cure than poly. I went over everything I did a week ago lightly just to knock down any burrs. Went over the inside corners of the stringers and tunnel with 4 layers of 1-inch strips of 1.5oz mat. This really rounded them off nicely in preparation for the next layers of glass. Trying to really think about how I lay the glass. Trying to avoid high ridges by staggering the ends. So far most of the mat is just for fairing purposes. Going to fair everything up quite a bit with mat before I start laying roving. This week had a lot of thinking about how to lay the glass with an emphasis on the flat spots for the rudder and strut.



Today, I put in a new order for a bunch of trailer parts from West Coast ABT:

1x - 6000 LB drop v-torsion axle - WITH brakes (including hubs/7000lb bearings)
1x - 6000 LB drop v-torsion axle - NO brakes (including hubs/7000lb bearings)
1x - 2x4x15" aluminum fender bracket/step pad
1x - 16" galvanized 6-lug rim
4x - Carlisle Sport Trail Tires ST225/75D15 1150kg

I beat about 1/4" of rust off the old axles. Still a couples years left in them, but that's about it. It was expensive, but I figured now was the time to take care of the trailer (while the boat is on blocks). Don't want an axle breaking later on too. Plus, the new torsion axles will allow me to adjust the axle trailing arm height/angle, which might give me a few more inches of clearance for the big 22" prop I'm gonna be swinging.



 

Kinaiahi61

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jan 17, 2012
519
206
Lihue, Hi
Name
Kalani
Boat
Kai Kea
Aloha Maka,
Nice work. I'm wondering why you're doing the layers one at a time? Just curious. Is it because of the VE? I know when I used VE it seemed to set off a lot faster than the iso, but after more research there are a lot more factors that affect the VE. Good progress, keep at it. Aloha
 

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
I usually get about 20-25 min working time with the VE catalyzed about 1.5%. I hear I can go less catalyst, but am also paranoid about a partial cure. The vinyl ester I get from Fiberglass Hawaii remains "tacky" a lot longer than polyester. Polyester generally can be sanded in a couple days. The vinyl ester I'm laying seems like it takes over a month to be sanded without gumming up the sand paper. Even stuff you lay a week later is too gummy to make more than a few passes with the sander. That said, if you lay all the fabric "beautifully" with tapered edges on the mat and don't require much (if any) sanding, you can just just knock the burrs down and do a heavy acetone wipe before the next layers. The acetone wipe leaves a sticky vinyl ester surface that seems like it might even give a chemical bond and not just a mechanical bond with the previous layer. I'm surprised how gummy the vinyl ester becomes after a heavy acetone wipe, even after a week-long cure.

Back to your question, we only did 1 layer of mat for a bunch of reasons...

-The first layer ended up taking almost 20 minutes to get every bubble out.

Also, I was happy with what we had gained so far and was afraid...

-Someone would mess up the peanut butter fillet
-Someone would smash the very soft blue clay I used to taper the rudder and strut locations
-Someone would mess up when we placed the second layer over the first layer and create a ton of bubbles in the first later by dragging the second layer over the top of the first layer

I was mostly just happy to get it all tacked together. We had to lay wet glass on top of the wet peanut butter fillet because the mold was coated with PVA so could not be sanded.

On the next big batches, we are definitely going to increase the amount of layers per session. I might get one other person which would make 4 of us total. We will also be alternating 18oz roving which reminds me of snake skin when it goes on. Really cool stuff. I am a lot more confident in our ability to get ALL the bubbles out faster when we are alternating roving/mat/roving instead of mat on mat. The wet roving surfaces aren't as delicate as putting mat on wet mat. Now that it is getting faired out we will definitely be alternating in roving which will make it easier for us too.

So yeah... next time I am hoping to get 3-4 layers done on the next batch before too much exotherm makes us stop. Don't want ANY bubbles though so we'll have to take what we can get.

Vacuum bagging sounds kind of good right about now, but I don't know anything about it....
 
Last edited:

starbright55

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Dec 4, 2011
491
105
San Diego
Name
TH
Boat
17' Avon Searider
The vinyl ester I get from Fiberglass Hawaii remains "tacky" a lot longer than polyester. Polyester generally can be sanded in a couple days. The vinyl ester I'm laying seems like it takes over a month to be sanded without gumming up the sand paper. Even stuff you lay a week later is too gummy to make more than a few passes with the sander.
Of course it stays tacky, you're using laminating resin, right?
 

Kinaiahi61

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Jan 17, 2012
519
206
Lihue, Hi
Name
Kalani
Boat
Kai Kea
Thanks for the reply Maka, yes that's a lot to deal with. I had a friend help me one day and it helped me out a lot, 3 others should be great. Not sure what rollers you're using, but the little hot dog 1/4" 6" rollers from HD worked great for applying the resin, getting out air bubbles, and fitting in the corners with the radiuses. Only thing is it got expensive after a while. If you have time amazon has them for way cheaper in 12 packs instead of the HD 6 pack (wish I found that earlier I wouldve ordered a bunch). Good luck you're doing great, love the progress.
 

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Of course it stays tacky, you're using laminating resin, right?
Yeah, laminating resin. I don't have too much experience with vinyl ester, but in my experience so far, the tackiness lasts longer with the VE resin than poly. Is that right? I do see the value there as far as having an extended time for a chemical bond. The VE I laid on the stringers a few months ago is fully sandable now with no clogging of the sand paper. The VE I laid 3-4 weeks ago still clogs the sand paper slightly. It is all catalyzed 1.5% with 20 min or so gel time for the resin. I mix it all the same way. I am sure it will all fully cure eventually, especially once more layers go on top. Anyone have experience with VE having longer kick times?

My plan for the tackiness is to basically use larger tapered layers of mat on top of all the layers of roving so that there is basically no need for fairing for the next layer. This will allow me to lay a lot of layers in a shorter amount of time. Even though it is slightly tacky, I'll do a quick pass with the sander just to knock off any burrs before the paper clogs. What do you guys think?
 
Last edited:

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Here's most of the stuff we use for glassing. Just depends on the size of the job. One guy with a padded roller, one guy with a metal roller and one guy with a brush usually works pretty good for us. Everything cleans up nice afterwards in an acetone bath except the roller pads which are discarded.

 

HelluvaBoater

I've posted enough I should edit this section
Mar 7, 2012
195
103
Maui
Name
Maka
Boat
Force 28
Gonna be attempting 3 more 30x80-inch layers in the next couple days.

1.5oz mat/18oz roving/1.5oz mat

We will perhaps do a couple extra smaller layers over where the rudder and strut will go before the final layer of mat goes on. This depends on how the first 2 layers go on.

If all goes well, I'm hoping we could get up to 5 layers in one session. But, I doubt that. That seems like too much to lay up at once.

Going to tone down the MEKP and put it in the freezer for a bit before we start laying it. Might mix with a drill to ensure a good mix since we are toning down the MEKP. Hopefully won't make bubbles with a drill. Thinking 1-quart sized batches for as many batches as we need. I've found that mixing consecutive batch mixes extends your work time with the resin because the top layers have not gelled nearly as long as the first layers you put down. Whenever you put an additional layer down, you buy yourself a ton of time as you keep mixing new batches. There comes a time as the laminate gets thick that it starts getting too hot and you get basically no work time and have to stop.

If we get 3 layers on, that will be a total of 3 layers mat and 1 layer roving. That might be enough to pull the mold off. Or perhaps we will do 3 more layers before the mold comes off. Not sure. Eager to figure out the rudder and shaft so I'll know where I can place the forward bulkhead.