Home Fishing

Fishing Options After a Windy Weather Week

Options After A Windy Weather Week

windy weather calico bassWe’re coming off yet another week of lousy windy weather and there isn’t a whole lot of exciting stuff to report. The good news is that we’ve got some good weather forecast for next few days, so the fish should bite better than they have been earlier this week. One thing to be aware of is that the water temps have likely taken a significant hit in most areas so I wouldn’t be expecting any miracles.

Starting out on the inshore scene, the bass are biting for the guys that are targeting them. The big bass at the top of this page was caught while fishing with Captain Gerry Mahieu at Catalina on Wednesday. According to his report, this fish was the stand out of the trip but his anglers caught plenty of fish at both Catalina and Palos Verdes. If I were heading out bass fishing this weekend, which I just happen to be, I’d probably stay local and split my time between the breakwall early and Palos Verdes late.

windy weather thresher sharkThe thresher sharks are also biting along the coast and most of them are a nice catchable size, like this 150-pound class fish Sivory Castellanos and Kevin Johnson caught while fishing out of Long Beach over the weekend. There are plenty of threshers scattered along the coast and multiple fish were caught this week. If you’re thinking about heading out and targeting them, I recommend avoiding using the standard drag and snag technique with bait-o-matics and the like. This results in a lot of tail hooked fish that make for a not fun fight and a dead or seriously injured fish at the end of the battle. If you’re interested in learning how to hook them in the mouth while trolling, you can find a thread about it on our message board here.

windy weather white sea bass fishThe fishing has been tough at the islands this week due to wind but there are still some seabass and yellows willing to bite at Anacapa for boats fishing out of Ventura Landings. The Aloha Spirit has been on the fish every time they’ve been able to get off the dock. There haven’t been any really big scores, but they’ve been managing a handful to a couple dozen yellows and seabass just about every trip. They even caught a big opah while fishing there last week. There are still yellows to be caught at San Clemente Island but the windy weather out there has been brutal and the boats that made it out to the island this week had trouble even keeping their anchors from dragging in the lee of the island. The good news is that the fish at the island aren’t going anywhere soon, so once the windy weather lays down and the water temps bounce back a bit, they should be biting again.

blue fin tuna yellowfishThe fish are still biting on the offshore scene, but the bad news is that the overwhelming majority of them are 2 to 4-pound yellowtail. Just be forewarned when you read the offshore reports that these are the bulk of the “limits of kelp paddy grade yellowtail” that are being caught. The good news is that there are some keeper sized yellows up to 10-pounds in the mix. I doubt anyone is going on these offshore trips looking to target small yellows anyway, they’re going in hopes of catching some bluefin. While there have been a few fish showing up in the counts the last few days (due to windy weather), like these two caught aboard the San Diego out of Seaforth Landing, the bite has a long way to go before being anything I’d call good.

navionics chartsSpeaking of tough offshore fishing, I wanted to share this picture to let you know how good we have it in Southern California. I spent last week fishing out of Crystal River on Florida’s west coast. In that part of the Gulf of Mexico, the water depth increases by approximately one foot per mile. As you can see by the line I’ve drawn, we had to run 60-miles offshore to reach water that was 65-feet deep. Makes you really appreciate the days of running on tuna foamers just a few miles off the beach in Orange County. Hopefully this weather straightens out enough to give us another dose of that this summer!

Advertisement
Previous articleBoatUS Tackles Ethanol Myths From ‘Big Ethanol’
Next articleWeekend Warriors…It’s Our Time – SoCal Fishing Reports
Erik Landesfeind is BD's Southern California Editor and has over 30 years of experience saltwater fishing for a range of species in both California and Mexican waters. Erik is also an active freelance writer and the author of the weekly column So Cal Scene, which BD publishes every Friday. In So Cal Scene, Erik keeps all of the BD readers up to date on what's biting in Southern California. Erik divides his fishing time on local boats, long-range trips and Mexico excursions. For the past eight years, Erik has been competing in the SWBA (Saltwater Bass Anglers) tournament series and has multiple tournament victories to his credit. His sponsors include Batson Enterprises / Rainshadow Rods, Robalo Boats, Tilly's Marine, Abu/Garcia, Penn Reels, Navionics, Raymarine, MC Swimbaits, Uni-Butter Fishing Scent and Bladerunner Tackle.