Boat Reviews

Edgewater 340CC – Battering Ram

The 340CC brings a new option into the Edgewater mix.

Edgewater Boats has had a 370 center console yacht with a big console cabin and all the niceties, but if you’ve wanted a straight-up fishing machine, up until now their model line essentially ended with the 320CC.

edgewater 340
With 850 horsepower on the transom, the new Edgewater 340CC is one potent contender.

Performance with a pair of F425 Yamaha XTO outboards actually out-shines that of its smaller sibling by a couple of mph, hitting a hat-stripping 58.8 mph and cruising in the low 40s. The fact that the boat can shred the ocean is not surprising, considering that Edgewater’s single-piece infusion (SPI) construction technique optimized the resin-to-glass ratio and minimize weight while maximizing strength.

Another construction touch you’ve gotta love on the 340CC is the attention to fit and finish. They say the devil’s in the details, and in this case, the details are eye-opening. A look at the helm tells you everything you need to know: every panel, seam, control, and cupholder seems perfectly placed and mounted. The same attention to detail is evident in the hatches, which are fully finished on both sides, gasketed, dog down tightly, and raise on gas-assist struts. Or look inside the forward lounge stowage compartment, which has dedicated racks for fishing rods, dive tanks, and even a pair of five-gallon buckets.

edgewater boat review
Fit and finish is a strong suit, on the Edgewater 340CC.

Some people may wish for more in the console compartment, which houses just a head and a sink, but remember that blowing out the console means eating into fishing space. If you want a cabin, jump up to the 370, but note that the 340 has at least as much fishing room as that larger model and maybe even more. In another smart move from the angling perspective, the bow seating is on the smaller side so you have room for several people to swing a rod from forward of the console. And while the forward console lounger is substantial (and comfy—this is definitely the spot to snag for relaxing) it’s not overwhelming, like some of those found on today’s center consoles.

Edgewater 340 Specifications

  • LOA – 33’4”
  • Beam – 10’6”
  • Draft – 2’2”
  • Displacement – 11,500
  • Transom deadrise –23.5 degrees
  • Fuel capacity – 330 gal.

As one would hope on a boat of this nature, fishing features are all present and accounted for. The gunwales and the transom are lined with flush-mount rod holders, there are six rocket launchers on the hardtop, fresh and raw water washdowns, a tackle station in the leaning post (assuming you opt for the fishing version, not the—shudder—grill), 32- and 38-gallon livewells, cockpit toe rails, a 155-gallon fishbox in the bowdeck, plus 66 gallons in the transom and in-deck and under-bow seat stowage.

boat reviews
Oh, so you like those transom rod holders? We thought so.

One thing that really stood out while we tromped across the deck of the 340CC is that the boat feels thoroughly solid underfoot. You know how you can feel the deck flex or the doors feel too light for their own good, on some modern boats? That’s not the case here. The same goes for the hardtop and pipework, which are as rigid as they come.

Edgewater boats
Pull on those pipes all you want, they won’t shake, wiggle, nor flex one iota.

Of course, we all know that quality doesn’t come cheap. And at its introduction, the 340CC started at around $340K (with twin Yamaha F300 V-6 outboards).

Electronics can add $40-odd-K (Edgewater rigs with Garmin) and going to F425s with Helm Master adds a hefty chunk at $65,000. Still, any way you cut it you’re getting what you pay for. And in this case, that’s top-shelf construction, top-shelf performance, and top-shelf fishability. Of course, that’s also what we’re used to seeing, from Edgewater.

Lenny Rudow
Lenny Rudow …has been a writer and editor in the marine field for over two decades, and has authored seven books. He is currently the Angler in Chie...