Lobster Hoop Netting Time!

Lobster Hoop Netting

October 1st marks the start of another California lobster season. It’s a long season, almost six months long, and I’m looking forward to a better season this year. The water was cold last year and the lobsters didn’t molt as often as usual so they didn’t grow that additional 15 percent. Hopefully we get better water conditions and bigger lobster this year.

When getting ready to go out hoop netting for lobster, one of the most important things to consider is your bait. At my lobster seminars, the most common question I get asked is what is my favorite type of bait to use.

Just about any fishy bait will work to attract the “Cockroaches Del Mar,” but red baits are the best baits. When the bugs are on the crawl and hungry, they will devour anything that doesn’t move fast enough to get away. They are scavengers and opportunistic feeders, but remember, lobsters have a very sophisticated sense of smell. The lobster uses its antennules to “sniff” through the water column.

The more chum or scent in the water, the more likely a lobster will be drawn out of its hole and come looking for a free dinner. The whole object of this wintertime sport is to get the lobsters in the hoop net and eating so intently that they will have to be pried leg by leg off the bait once you get the net up and into the boat. If you need to pry them off your nets, try to do this carefully so these precious bugs aren’t damaged. Legs and antennae break off easily and this slows down the animal’s growth when it happens.

You will catch more lobsters if you have an oily type of fish in your bait cage or bait pocket — baits such as skipjack, bonito and the other tunas, salmon heads and parts, sardines, anchovies, and the lowly mackerel/saba.

When you drop a hoop net in the water with one, or any combination of these baits, an oil slick immediately forms and starts sending that odorous chum down current to attract a family of lobsters for a meal. The first drop always has a lot of chumming ability, but after you have pulled the net up the first or second time, you might want to freshen up the bait/chum by adding some new bait or switching out the bait cage for a fresh one.

Many guys debate over which is best — fresh bait or “ripened” bait. I prefer fresh bait and I think it usually outperforms old or ripe bait. I just don’t see ripe bait putting out as big of an oil slick as a fresh, bloody bonito or skipjack, and I know that if I were looking for something to eat, I’d rather it was fresh!

In the classic 1960’s book “About Lobster” by T. M. Pruden, he says, “Lobsters will not touch putrid food. Lobstermen agree that fresh bait fishes best, and they would use it wholly if they could get it, but some think there are times when riper bait is actually better. They know that lobsters are more fastidious than crabs, which will eat anything even if it is rotten.”

Mackerel is probably the most common lobster bait used in Southern California. It is virtually free and available most of the season. When the opportunity is there, make all the bait your freezer can handle. Mackerel tend to migrate out of our local waters and disappear when the water cools off in the late winter, so get it while you can. Some fish wholesalers have 50-pound blocks of frozen macks available all year long. If you don’t have a large-enough freezer to accommodate this amount of bait, try splitting it with another hooper.

Using a sabiki or Lucky Joe multiple hook rig is the best way to collect a bucket of macks in short order. I like cutting the sabiki rigs from six hooks down to four. It makes it a lot easier to reel them in and the mackerel don’t tangle the four-hook set ups as often as the longer six-hook rigs.


Know The Regulations

Now that we’ve got the bait covered, you really need to be aware of the lobster regulations so you don’t get yourself in a pinch. The California Department of Fish and Game made a new set of Lobster Regulations legal on April 1, 2011. There has been a lot of confusion about them, so to help clarify them I’ve included a copy of the new regulations and a simple explanation of them.

The following lobster regulations come from the booklet “California Regulations, 2011-2012 Ocean Sport Fishing,” published by the DFG. I also follow it up with my own translations in plain English.

Regulations can change from year to year, and the laws on lobster hoop-netting are likely to change again, so be sure to read the current regulations before you set out hooping.

CRUSTACEANS

29.80 Gear Restrictions.

(a) General Provisions:

(1 thru 3 have not changed)

(b) Hoop nets may be used to take spiny lobsters and all species of crab. Between Point Arguello, Santa Barbara County, and the United States-Mexico border, not more than five hoop nets as defined in (b)(1)(A) or (b)(1)(B) shall be possessed by a person when taking spiny lobster or crab, not to exceed a total of 10 hoop nets possessed when taking spiny lobster or crab, per vessel. The owner of the hoop net or person who placed the hoop net into the water shall raise the hoop net to the surface and inspect the contents of the hoop net at intervals not to exceed two hours.

(1) Hoop Net Defined: There are two types of hoop nets allowed for use. They shall be defined as:

(A) Type A: Fishing gear that is comprised of one to three rigid ring(s), with each ring measuring no greater than 36 inches in inside diameter nor less than 10 inches in inside diameter, which is/are connected to soft mesh thereby forming a circular-shaped net with an enclosed bottom. Lift lines may be attached only to the top ring. A second and third rigid ring(s) may be connected by soft mesh to the top ring; however, each ring must be equal in size to or smaller than the ring above it. When the net is being raised the top ring shall be above and parallel to all other rings, with the enclosed bottom portion of the soft mesh even with or hanging below all other rings. All parts of the hoop net shall collapse and lie flat on the ocean floor in such a manner that the gear does not entrap or restrict the free movement of crustaceans until lifted. When suspended from lift lines, the entire hoop net shall measure no more taller than 36 inches. The ring material shall not be thicker than one inch in any dimension.

(B) Type B: Fishing gear that is comprised of two to three rigid rings (not including the bait ring) with each ring measuring no greater than 36 inches in inside diameter and the top ring measuring no less than 15 inches in inside diameter. The upper ring or rings shall be connected to the bottom ring and supported by no more than six rigid support arms, and the assembled frame shall measure no more than 10 inches tall. The rings and support material shall not be thicker than one inch in any dimension. All rings shall be connected by soft mesh, thereby forming a net with an enclosed bottom, and lift lines shall be attached only to the top ring. When suspended from lift lines the enclosed bottom portion of the net shall be even with or hanging below all other rings, and the entire net shall measure no taller than 30 inches. A bait ring may be attached to the net as long as the ring is not part of the rigid frame.

(2) Any hoop net abandoned or left unchecked for more than 2 hours may be considered abandoned and may be seized by any person authorized to enforce these regulations.

In Plain English

These new regulations and gear definitions adopted on April 1, 2011 allow the majority of the hoop-netters in Southern California to continue to use the Promar or Danielson traditional and conical style nets that they used in the past. All of the designs currently on the market fit the new Type A and Type B definitions.

The major change from previous years regulations is the removal of the word baited from the number of nets allowed. No longer will you be able to bring extra un-baited nets along on those overnight island trips, and you had better think twice about picking up that abandoned float and net and then being technically over limit on your hooping gear.

The regulation now allows five nets per person or 10 nets maximum on the boat or yak. The other big change is the new two-hour time limit on unchecked or abandoned nets. How this time limit will be enforced is yet to be seen, although I know my local Redondo Harbor Patrol likes hoopers along the break-wall to be in visual attendance of their nets, and will confiscate unattended nets.

Read More!

Jim Salazar is one of the most respected lobster fishermen in Southern California. He literally wrote the book on hoop-netting, and some of this article was excerpted from “Hoopin’ It Up: A Guide to Lobster and Crab Hoop Netting,” which he recently updated with all of the new California regulations.

If you want to learn more of Jim’s tricks, including the best rigging techniques and bait preparations, make sure to pick up a copy of his book. It’s a quick read and gives you the no-nonsense information you need to catch more lobster. You can find it in all of the major tackle shops in Southern California, or pick it up online at www.sabaslayer.com/html/book.html.

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Jim Salazar is one of the most respected lobster fishermen in Southern California. He literally wrote the book on hoop-netting, titled “Hoopin' It Up: A Guide to Lobster and Crab Hoop Netting,” which he recently updated with all of the new California regulations.  If you want to learn more of Jim's tricks, including the best rigging techniques and bait preparations, make sure to pick up a copy of his book. It's a quick read and gives you the no-nonsense information you need to catch more lobster. You can find it in all of the major tackle shops in Southern California, or pick it up online at www.sabaslayer.com/html/book.html.