East Coast Ling Cod???

Discussion in 'Washington State' started by sumpnz, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. sumpnz

    sumpnz Newbie

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    I was talking to my dad over the weekend and recounted my ling cod catch from a couple months ago. He stated that he didn't care for ling cod as it was "too oily" for him. Now, the lings I caught were not at all oily, far as I could tell anyway. My kids liked it better than the halibut I caught on the same trip.

    His prior experience was with "ling cod" he'd caught on the east coast back in the late 60's/early 70's. He was in the Army (stationed in Maryland - got lucky and never went to Vietnam) and had some Navy buddies that had boats that took him fishing a few times.

    Is the ling cod off the east coast the same as the ling cod out here? Is there a size beyond which they get particularly oily?

    EDIT: MODS - I meant to put this in the main WA section, not fishing reports. Can you move it please?
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2011
  2. Tower Todd

    Tower Todd Number #2

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    I don't think he caught lings in MD. They do have cod, but they are a different type.

    TT
     
  3. Siv

    Siv Well-Known "Member"

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    Being from New England and growing us catching bottom fish back there I can assure you there is no such thing as our Lings in the Atlantic. They do call one of the hake species ( there are red hake, white hake... ) lings, especially from New York south. We never kept them when we hooked one, the guys my Dad fished with would toss them back.

    Might explain the " oily " issue.
     
  4. outtadablu

    outtadablu Gettin' Ready to go KILL some fishes

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    I grew up in MD and fished the Chesapeake Bay extensively with my Dad. The "oilest" fish I ever caught was Bluefish, but I think he may be talking about Spotted Seatrout and I guess they could be considered "oily" but more of a strong fish flavor. All the others I caught - Drum, stripped bass, perch... were white flaky like our ling cod. And yea, my kids like it better also.
     
  5. Clockwork

    Clockwork I've posted enough I should edit this section

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    hes talking about "Ling" which is a true cod like a burbot or hake. why we call out lingcod is a good question, they're not a cod and there is already a true ling cod.
     
  6. North River

    North River Well-Known "Member"

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    There is also the Cobia. One of their nicknames is Ling.
     
  7. conchydong

    conchydong Untitled

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    I think your dad might have gotton mixed up in his terminology. None of the east coast fish that have the word cod or ling in them are oily fish. In fact, quite the opposite. Bluefish, as previously mentioned, and the mackerels are oily but the cod family are non-oily and white fleshed.
    In the south, particularly the Gulf of Mexico, Cobia are called ling and they are not oily either. But as far as Lingcod goes, that is a Pacific fish.
     
  8. sumpnz

    sumpnz Newbie

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    Thanks guys.
     

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